Pet food brands – Pass Pet http://passpet.org/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 03:07:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://passpet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Pet food brands – Pass Pet http://passpet.org/ 32 32 These 6 brands of pet food are nationally recalled https://passpet.org/these-6-brands-of-pet-food-are-nationally-recalled/ https://passpet.org/these-6-brands-of-pet-food-are-nationally-recalled/#respond Fri, 30 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/these-6-brands-of-pet-food-are-nationally-recalled/ An important update for pet owners: The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just released an announcement to notify dog ​​owners that various types of dog food have been recalled after it was shipped to retailers such as Chewy, Walmart, Amazon, etc. We have the details. On Thursday, the FDA issued an advisory alerting […]]]>

An important update for pet owners: The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) just released an announcement to notify dog ​​owners that various types of dog food have been recalled after it was shipped to retailers such as Chewy, Walmart, Amazon, etc. We have the details.

On Thursday, the FDA issued an advisory alerting consumers to a recall on varieties of the following six dog food brands: Triumph, Evolve, Wild Harvest, Nurture Farms, Pure Being and Elm.

The specific flavors, lot numbers, UPC codes and expiration dates of the recalled dog foods can be found in the table below, as published by the FDA.

Courtesy of the FDA

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The recall was issued after the brand’s manufacturer, Sunshine Mills, Inc., identified the presence of “potentially elevated levels of aflatoxin above the acceptable limit.” The FDA explains that “Aflatoxin poisoning can also occur if a pet eats moldy corn, grains, peanuts, or other foods contaminated with aflatoxins … even if there is no visible mold. on pet food ”.

In these cases, the FDA says exposure to aflatoxins can cause any of the following symptoms:

“[S]heaviness, loss of appetite, vomiting, jaundice (yellowish tinge of the eyes, gums or skin due to liver damage), unexplained bruising or bleeding and / or diarrhea. In some cases, aflatoxins can affect blood clotting and cause long-term liver problems and / or death. Some pets can suffer from liver damage without showing signs in the early stages of aflatoxin poisoning and if they continue to eat contaminated food they can die suddenly. “

In Thursday’s announcement, Sunshine Mills said “no illnesses have been reported in association with these products to date.” They also suggest that pets should be seen by a veterinarian if they experience any of the above symptoms after consuming any of the recalled dog foods.

The company also advises: “Consumers who have purchased the recalled products should stop using the product and may return the unused portion to the place of purchase for a full refund. Consumers may contact customer service at Sunshine Mills, Inc. at (800) 705-2111 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. CST, Monday through Friday, or by email at customer.service@sunshinemills.com for more information. “

Learn more about health, food safety and recalls news:


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How can pet food brands meet sustainability demands? https://passpet.org/how-can-pet-food-brands-meet-sustainability-demands/ https://passpet.org/how-can-pet-food-brands-meet-sustainability-demands/#respond Fri, 09 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/how-can-pet-food-brands-meet-sustainability-demands/ A survey of global consumers shows that many believe companies are the most responsible for addressing sustainability issues such as increasing the amount of recycled packaging or reducing emissions from air travel – more responsible than governments or the consumers themselves. That’s what the new Mintel Sustainability Barometer says, a survey report. In addition to […]]]>

A survey of global consumers shows that many believe companies are the most responsible for addressing sustainability issues such as increasing the amount of recycled packaging or reducing emissions from air travel – more responsible than governments or the consumers themselves.

That’s what the new Mintel Sustainability Barometer says, a survey report. In addition to the 48% of consumers worldwide who say companies are most responsible for sustainability (compared to 25% for consumers or 20% for governments), 44% say they believe the country where they live is suffering from climate change. , but only 33%, on average, believe their country is a contributor.

“There seems to be a sustainability gap – a stark difference between consumers’ experience with the causes of climate change and the reality of where the responsibilities lie,” says Richard Cope, senior trends consultant for Mintel. “One of the main challenges for businesses and brands is how to effectively bridge this understanding gap in order to better position their products and services as part of the sustainability solution. It will require more education on the uncomfortable realities if more consumers are to get involved in the environmental issues and products. “

The survey revealed some ways for businesses and brands to better connect with consumers about sustainability. In terms of what encourages them to buy products or services that claim to benefit or protect the environment, respondents said they most wanted information about the direct impact of their purchase (e.g. a tree planted per purchase), followed by labeling to show the environmental impact of the product, such as its CO2 emissions, the amount of water used or the distance traveled to reach the consumer.

Pet Food Environmental Footprint Labels

These survey results may offer insight to pet food companies and brands, although one challenge (not unique to pet food) is the lack of standardization in footprint measurement. carbon. Even where a robust methodology exists, such as Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), to date there is no standardization in our industry as to how to conduct one. (For more information on ACVs in pet foods, check out this webinar, “How Sustainability Impacts Pet Food Ingredients, Packaging,” in which Heather Acuff, Business Development Manager of products for Nulo Pet Food, provides an overview of the LCA framework.)

Reaching the point of being able to provide sustainability-related information on labels could be critical for consumers increasingly focused on this, as the environmental footprint of pet foods has been criticized by mainstream media, consumers. environmental and other organizations. The main culprit, according to most of these reviews, is animal protein sources, especially livestock. (Pet food suppliers using other protein sources also often take this approach in their marketing strategies and materials.)

The “evidence” they frequently cite is a study published by Gregory S. Okin of the University of California, Los Angeles in 2017 which allegedly shows that “the consumption of animal products for dogs and cats is responsible for the release of up to 64 ± 16 million tonnes of CO.2-equivalent to methane and nitrous oxide, two powerful greenhouse gases.

While several of Okin’s research findings, especially some of the pet food assumptions he made while leading them, have been refuted by pet food experts and related organizations, these documents do not tend to be found or reported in most articles citing Okin’s study. (Or maybe they’re discounted as industry bias.)

Do traditional pet food proteins deserve a high carbon footprint?

Recently, an expert who has also studied the durability of protein in pet foods, Kelly S. Swanson, Ph.D., professor of comparative research in nutrition and nutrigenomics at the University of Illinois at Urbana -Champaign, addressed other hypotheses regarding these protein sources. and how they are used in pet foods. In an Ask the Pet Food Pro discussion on new proteins, he said that in many cases an LCA to calculate a product’s carbon footprint is based on human food.

“Unfortunately, I think the key limiter on the pets side is that some people will give the same values,” he explained. For example: “If you have meat and bone meal versus a sirloin steak, we clearly know that these are different products. They come from different cuts, and you have the bone there, but some people give them the same carbon footprint because it comes from a cow. I guess I don’t agree with that philosophy, if especially on the companion animal side, with livestock or aquaculture, we use byproducts, that really gives credit, if you will, to it. food industry.

In other words, if half of an animal’s carcass is not intended for human food production but is used in pet food or other animal feed product, it is ‘sustainable use of the whole animal. “I think it doesn’t deserve to have the same footprint,” Swanson said.

In his article, Okin touched on this concept that pet food contributes to sustainability by using by-products (or, as Swanson calls them, by-products) of animal production for human consumption. “The argument that the environmental and energy impacts of dogs and cats are avoided by eating byproducts of the human food system, and otherwise the material would be wasted, rests on the assumption that these same byproducts could not be made to be fit for human consumption after proper processing, ”Okin wrote.

Of course, the point is that they are not suitable, because most of us humans in the western world reject their consumption! (Okin did not discuss this in his article.)

However, there is an agreement with Okin regarding human grade protein in pet foods; Swanson has pointed out their lack of sustainability in his previous research. I believe Swanson and others would also agree with Okin’s conclusion that over-nutrition – the growing incidence of obesity in pets – increases the carbon footprint of pet food.

The power of upcycling in pet foods

Finding common ground on sustainability, for pet foods or in general, is difficult in part because of this lack of standardization in measurements and methodologies. Since the Okin study, some progress has been made with pet food: for example, in 2018 the FEDIAF (European Federation of the Pet Food Industry) published rules and guidelines guidelines for environmental footprints for various products (cited by Acuff in their webinar presentation). And more recently, the Pet Sustainability Coalition (PSC) conducted research on the carbon footprint of pet food protein sources with Iowa State University.

Much research is still needed, and hopefully work will soon be available and as widely referenced as the Okin study. Meanwhile, pet foods have a strong sustainability to say, first with the protein ingredients which are byproducts of animal production for humans. Unfortunately, they have received a negative and deceptive reputation in the past on pet food review sites (sometimes inspired by marketing messages from the pet food companies themselves) for not being nutritious. or of good quality, when in fact they are very digestible, palatable and nutritious for dogs and cats.

Perhaps the bad reputation can be overcome by calling these ingredients secondary products, as Swanson does, or by referring to their use with a popular new term: recycling. Yes, it’s a buzzword now, but it may have lasting power thanks to the growing number of sustainability-conscious consumers.

Swanson made this connection during the Ask the Pet Food Pro chat. “The pet food industry, since its inception, has sort of recycled and used things that others considered not to be human food. And again, in the United States, we don’t eat certain things that are eaten in other parts of the world. So we have to think of it that way. “

To note: Caitlyn Dudas, Executive Director and Co-Founder of PSC, will present information from their pet food protein study at the Petfood Forum 2021, while Aurelie de Ratuld, Ph.D., CSR Director for Diana Pet Food, will speak on LCA and Swanson will host a panel discussion on fresh and human grade pet food.

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Some pet food brands now use insect protein to reduce their carbon impact https://passpet.org/some-pet-food-brands-now-use-insect-protein-to-reduce-their-carbon-impact/ https://passpet.org/some-pet-food-brands-now-use-insect-protein-to-reduce-their-carbon-impact/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/some-pet-food-brands-now-use-insect-protein-to-reduce-their-carbon-impact/ Pet food manufacturers are swapping proteins from meat for those from insects in an effort to reduce the environmental impact or carbon footprint of your cat or dog. Big brands like Nestlé Purina and Mars have recently joined the movement using dried black soldier fly larvae, while other companies, such as Jiminy’s, are using cricket […]]]>

Pet food manufacturers are swapping proteins from meat for those from insects in an effort to reduce the environmental impact or carbon footprint of your cat or dog.

Big brands like Nestlé Purina and Mars have recently joined the movement using dried black soldier fly larvae, while other companies, such as Jiminy’s, are using cricket protein.

This change aims to reduce the 64 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emitted each year from the production and consumption of meat products.

Some companies claim their insect farms generate only four percent of the current emissions emitted each year by farms that raise cows, pigs and chickens.

Using insect protein as a base requires significantly less food, soil, and water, which generates less greenhouse gases per pound than those made with beef, pork, or chicken.

Big brands like Nestlé Purina and Mars recently joined the movement using dried black soldier fly larvae

Thanks in part to the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement, the world has made a huge green shift in recent years, hoping to cut carbon emissions to fight climate change.

And it seems even the pet food brands want to do their part.

In November 2020, Purina launched its Beyond Nature’s Protein range for cats and dogs in Switzerland, which contains two recipes: one made with chicken, pork liver and millet; the second using protein from insects, chicken and beans.

The insect protein comes from the black soldier fly larva, which is also used by Mars in its new LoveBug for cats first launched in the UK.

Using the larva allows companies to create a taste that mimics “beef and cheese,” so our furry friends probably don't taste like traditional meat products.

Using the larva allows companies to create a taste that mimics “beef and cheese,” so our furry friends probably don’t taste like traditional meat products.

Mars uses black soldier fly larvae for its new LoveBug for cats which first launched in the UK

Mars uses black soldier fly larvae for its new LoveBug for cats which first launched in the UK

However, the ingredient was not approved in the United States until last January for adult dogs and its use in cats is expected to be given in 2022.

Using the larva allows companies to create a taste that mimics “beef and cheese,” so our furry friends probably don’t taste any different from traditional meat products.

Insect protein also includes beneficial omega 6s, as well as nine pet fatty acids, which can also provide the same nutrients when consumed by humans.

A representative from Mars Petcare told PetFoodIndustry.com via email: “The insects we use and the process by which insects and animal feed are transmitted are all designed to produce safe and nutritious food for your cat. Protix takes the utmost care and responsibility to improve animal welfare.

“It starts from the reproductive stage to the final processing stage, the larvae are well cared for, protected and allowed to express normal insect behavior. “

Larvae can be grown in smaller spaces that would not be suitable for cows or pigs, and the production site can be designed to grow vertically.

Petco, a leading pet chain, added Jiminy’s insect dog food and treats to its product line, which uses crickets, on June 5.

Jiminy products are formulated with insect protein powder instead of traditional protein options such as beef or poultry, which have a significant impact on the environment.

Other companies are replacing meat protein with mealworms to fight climate change

Other companies are replacing meat protein with mealworms to fight climate change

Yora Pet Foods, a UK startup, uses the insect ingredient which the company says only needs 2% of the land needed for raising livestock to produce 22 pounds of protein, while generating around 4%. shows.

Yora Pet Foods, a UK startup, uses the insect ingredient which the company says only needs 2% of the land needed for raising livestock to produce 22 pounds of protein, while generating around 4%. shows.

In the past year alone, Jiminy’s estimates its products have saved 218 million gallons of water and 20.5 million grams of greenhouse gas emissions.

Jiminy’s Founder and CEO Anne Carlson said in a statement: “The carbon footprint of pet owners is enormous, with more than 89 million dogs in the United States consuming more than 32 billion pounds of protein each. year.

“Jiminy’s use of insect-based protein powders inspires pet owners to rethink their dog’s diets and to make a healthy choice for animals and the planet. We are excited to now offer our full line of products in stores and online at Petco, allowing more dog owners to switch to alternative proteins for their pets. ‘

Crickets are a great source of vitamins, minerals, omega 3 and 6 fatty acids, and they actually provide more iron, vitamin B12, and magnesium than beef.

Other companies are replacing meat proteins with mealworms to fight climate change.

Yora Pet Foods, a UK startup, uses the insect ingredient which the company says only needs 2% of the land needed for raising cattle to produce 22 pounds of protein, while generating around 4% of the emissions.


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Four Major Superpremium Pet Food Brands Are Changing Hands: What Does It Mean? | Blogs https://passpet.org/four-major-superpremium-pet-food-brands-are-changing-hands-what-does-it-mean-blogs/ https://passpet.org/four-major-superpremium-pet-food-brands-are-changing-hands-what-does-it-mean-blogs/#respond Thu, 01 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/four-major-superpremium-pet-food-brands-are-changing-hands-what-does-it-mean-blogs/ As the premier pet commodity – and further bolstered by the global resources of leading market players including Nestlé Purina, Mars, General Mills (Blue Buffalo) and Colgate-Palmolive (Hill’s) – the industry pet food has not only resisted COVID-19, it has, overall, come out on top. In the first months of the pandemic and subsequent waves, […]]]>

As the premier pet commodity – and further bolstered by the global resources of leading market players including Nestlé Purina, Mars, General Mills (Blue Buffalo) and Colgate-Palmolive (Hill’s) – the industry pet food has not only resisted COVID-19, it has, overall, come out on top. In the first months of the pandemic and subsequent waves, storage increased sales of pet food and other commodities, leading market watchers to expect a proportional correction. leading, at best, to a breakeven point in sales in 2020 compared to the “crisis-free” years preceding the pandemic. Instead, the home trend, the boom in pet adoption, and the adaptive behaviors of consumers, marketing, and retail have driven even higher spending levels in 2020.

In the February 2021 Packaged Facts pet owner survey, nearly three-fifths (56%) of respondents said COVID-19 had an impact on their household’s level of pet food spending. company, with six times the increase in their expenses (29%) than as opposed to the reduction (5 percent). As these numbers suggest, the U.S. pet food market has gotten through 2020 with flying colors, with sales increasing nearly 16% to $ 44 billion, roughly double the average annual growth rate over the years. five years before the pandemic.

This warm demonstration of the pet food industry during the pandemic and the concomitant increase in pet adoption has rekindled interest from the investment community, with pet food manufacturers from company, traders and suppliers in the foreground. In a telling illustration of the fertile times, in the last quarter of calendar year 2020, four of the pet food industry’s oldest and most respected natural brand companies changed hands:

  • In October, Joey Herrick, veteran of the pet food industry and founder of Natural Balance Pet Food, bought Breeder’s Choice Pet Foods from Central Garden & Pet, along with brands such as Breeder’s Choice, AvoDerm and Pinnacle, as well as personalized private labels.
  • In November, private equity and investment firm Clearlake Capital Group LP purchased WellPet from its former private equity owner, Berwind Corp. Founded in 1926 as Old Mother Hubbard Natural Dog Treats, WellPet produces premium natural pet foods under the Wellness, Eagle Pack, Holistic Select label. and the Sojos brands, as well as Old Mother Hubbard dog treats and Whimzees dental treats and treats.
  • In November, Health & Happiness Group International Holdings Ltd. (H&H Group), based in Hong Kong, acquired Solid Gold Pet for US $ 163 million. Founded in 1974 as a supplier of holistic nutrition for dogs and cats, Solid Gold Pet produces a wide range of complete and balanced wet and dry diets, meal garnishes and supplements.
  • In December, Nexus Capital Management LP signed a definitive agreement to acquire the Natural Balance pet food business from JM Smucker for approximately $ 50 million in cash, and at the end of January 2021, the agreement was finalized. Founded in 1989, Natural Balance was sold to Del Monte in May 2013 through a merger agreement and acquired by Smucker in 2015 with its $ 5.8 billion purchase of Del Monte’s Big Heart Pet Brands, whose food portfolio for pets also included 9Lives, Milk-Bone, Meow Mix, Kibbles’ n Bits, Gravy Train, and Nature’s Recipe (which remain the property of Smucker).

Poor performance is one of the reasons a venerable brand changes hands, but the same is true for good or improved performance, so one can only speculate on the justifications for the Solid Gold and WellPet transitions several months after the release. pandemic. Solid Gold reported sales of $ 55 million in the U.S. and international markets in September alone, with a year-over-year growth rate of 39%. In mid-March 2021, a few months after acquiring WellPet, Clearlake replaced Camelle Kent-Rizkalla as CEO with Reed Howlett, a former CEO of Nature’s Variety.

The situation for Natural Balance appears more rosy, with Smucker reporting disappointing pre-divestment sales, even though Natural Balance generated net sales of around $ 220 million in Smucker’s fiscal year ended April 30. Natural Balance was a stepson of the mass-market driven Smucker pet food family, particularly in relation to also celebrity-backed Rachael Ray Nutrish, the gem of the Ainsworth Pet acquisition. Nutrition by Smucker for $ 1.7 billion as of April 2018. It may also be enough to assume that Breeder’s Choice, a company specializing in companion animals, had not met the high hopes of Central Garden & Pet, which had paid $ 25 million for the company in 2006.

One thing the four sales / acquisitions mentioned above have in common is that they involve super premium natural pet food brands anchored in the specialty pet channel that are now on a new playing field against e-commerce and mass premiumization, the latter trend driven strongly by the success of the mass brand Nutrish and the Blue pet crossover. As Petfood Industry Editor-in-Chief Debbie Phillips-Donaldson puts it in her ‘Adventures in Pet Food’ blog on December 11, 2020, “… it’s clear that Natural Balance, a super premium brand traditionally available through channels like the specialty for pets, no longer suitable. the Smucker strategy. What we can’t predict is whether that portends a move away from the superpremium and the specialty channel, for the market as a whole or just for this company and this situation.

The truer words have never been spoken. Also under fire from electronic communications, the pet chain is undergoing strategic transformation on several fronts, including its growing reliance on services and proprietary brands to drive physical sales, and an online presence of more and more solid. It seems unlikely that any of the four reputable pet food companies recently sold above would suddenly swerve into physical mass channels given the already overheated competition from superpremiums / natural there. Then again, when it comes to “pet exclusive” brands that are mushrooming, never say never.







David Lummis is the Senior Pet Market Analyst for Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, and author of Packaged Facts US Pet Market Outlook, 2021-2022: The data cited is from the February 2021 Packaged Facts survey of pet owners. (packagefacts.com)


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There is a massive recall of these brands of pet food which may also make humans sick https://passpet.org/there-is-a-massive-recall-of-these-brands-of-pet-food-which-may-also-make-humans-sick/ https://passpet.org/there-is-a-massive-recall-of-these-brands-of-pet-food-which-may-also-make-humans-sick/#respond Mon, 29 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/there-is-a-massive-recall-of-these-brands-of-pet-food-which-may-also-make-humans-sick/ More than 130 types of pet food have been voluntarily recalled because they could potentially be contaminated with salmonella, according to a notice issued by the FDA. And not only are pets in danger, but also humans who handle food. Midwestern Pet Foods has recalled various brands of cat and dog food, including CanineX, Earthborn […]]]>

More than 130 types of pet food have been voluntarily recalled because they could potentially be contaminated with salmonella, according to a notice issued by the FDA. And not only are pets in danger, but also humans who handle food.

Midwestern Pet Foods has recalled various brands of cat and dog food, including CanineX, Earthborn Holistic, Meridian, Pro Pac, Pro Pac Ultimates, Sportmix, Sportmix Wholesomes, Sportstrail, Unrefined and Venture. The bags were made at Midwestern’s factory in Monmouth, Illinois. Sold nationwide, they have a lot of code EXP 02/22 / M1L #. The possible contamination was discovered through a routine sampling program by the company. (Related: The 7 Healthiest Foods To Eat Right Now)

In humans, Salmonella can cause diarrhea, fever, nausea, stomach pain, and vomiting. The strains can also cause infections in urine, blood, bones, joints or the nervous system (cerebrospinal fluid and brain), and can cause serious illness. Animals with Salmonella disease may show symptoms such as decreased appetite, diarrhea, fever, fatigue and vomiting. However, some pets may not have any noticeable symptoms, so be sure to contact your veterinarian if they have come in contact with any of the recalled foods.

“Salmonella can affect animals that eat the products and there is a risk for humans to handle contaminated pet products, especially if they have not washed their hands properly after coming into contact with the products or any surface exposed to these products, “says the notice.

For the full list of affected products, you can visit the FDA website here. If you have contaminated pet food in your home you should throw it away now, just make sure it is out of reach of pets and children. Additionally, wash your hands and sanitize pet bowls, storage containers, and other surfaces that may have come in contact with food.

When checking your pantry, you should also look for a product sold exclusively at Costco – it is being recalled because it might contain small pieces of metal. And to receive all the latest grocery store news every day straight to your email inbox, Subscribe to our newsletter !


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Better Choice Appoints Expert in Pet Food Brands, https://passpet.org/better-choice-appoints-expert-in-pet-food-brands/ https://passpet.org/better-choice-appoints-expert-in-pet-food-brands/#respond Wed, 13 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/better-choice-appoints-expert-in-pet-food-brands/ NEW YORK, January 13, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Better Choice Company (OTCQX: BTTR) (“Better Choice”) (the “Company”), an animal health and welfare company, today announced the appointment of Donald Young as the Company’s new Executive Vice President of Sales, effective January 1, 2021. Donald Young joins The Better Choice Company with over 29 years of […]]]>

NEW YORK, January 13, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Better Choice Company (OTCQX: BTTR) (“Better Choice”) (the “Company”), an animal health and welfare company, today announced the appointment of Donald Young as the Company’s new Executive Vice President of Sales, effective January 1, 2021.

Donald Young joins The Better Choice Company with over 29 years of experience leading the sales organizations for several leading pet food brands including The Nutro Company (Natural Choice, MAX and Greenies brands) and Merrick Pet Care, Inc. (Merrick, Backcountry, Purrfect Bistro, and Fresh Kisses).

Following his success at The Nutro Company, Mr. Young led the turnaround and expansion of Merrick Pet Care’s Pet Specialty business from 2010 to 2020, where he was directly responsible for growing a brand’s business. niche to natural player # 3 in the pet. specialized retail channel. Merrick Pet Care more than quadrupled its sales during this period, surpassing $ 500 million and ultimately leading to the sale of Merrick Pet Care to Nestlé Purina Company. Donald has also been recognized by his peers in the companion animal industry for his track record of achievement, winning numerous sales awards throughout his career, including recognition as one of the 2019 ICON winners of the Pet Age Magazine.

Scott Lerner, CEO of The Better Choice Company, said: “We are extremely pleased to have Donald join our team. We look forward to seeing him build on his past successes to help grow and expand Better Choice’s brands in the Pet Specialty channel.

Donald Young said: “I have been incredibly impressed with the caliber of the team that Better Choice has assembled and I am delighted to start and build on the momentum already created. I am committed to building a world-class sales team that is empowered to do what’s right for our retail partners so that we can all be successful together. Whether it’s investing in education and services or just providing the best possible product for pet parents.

Michael Young, President of Better Choice Company, added, “Attracting talent like Donald Young is a testament to the quality of the platform Better Choice has built and continues to build. We continue to add world-class industry experts as we achieve our goal of building the most dynamic team in the animal health and welfare industry. With recent additions to our team as well as recent announcements regarding changes to our capital structure, Better Choice is extremely well positioned to capitalize on key industry macroeconomic trends. Donald will be located in downtown Nashville, TN, where we just announced a repositioning of our fulfillment and distribution centers.

About Better Choice Company, Inc.

Better Choice Company Inc. is a growing animal health and welfare company committed to leading the industry shift towards pet products and services that help dogs and cats live healthy lives. better health, happier and longer. We take an alternative, nutrition-based approach to animal health to conventional dog and cat food offerings and position our brand portfolio to benefit from the prevailing trends in the growing humanization of companion animals and emphasis. by consumers on health and wellness. We have a proven track record of decades of successful selling trusted animal health and welfare products and leverage our established digital footprint to provide pet parents with the knowledge to make informed decisions. concerning the health of their pets. We sell the majority of our dog food, cat food and treats under the Halo and TruDog brands, which focus on providing sustainably sourced kibble and canned foods derived from real whole meat, respectively, and raw and minimally processed dog food and treats. . For more information, please visit https://www.betterchoicecompany.com.

Forward-looking statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The words “believe”, “may”, “estimate”, “continue”, “anticipate”, “intend”, ” should, “The Company has based these forward-looking statements in large part on our current expectations and projections regarding future events and financial trends that we believe could affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy and needs. financial. Some or all of the results anticipated by these forward-looking statements may not be achieved. Further information on the Company’s risk factors is contained in our filings with the SEC. Any forward-looking statements we make here speak only as of the date on which they are made. Factors or events that could cause our actual results to vary may occur from time to time and we cannot predict all of them. The Company assumes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise, except as required by law.

Company details :
Best Choice Company, Inc.
Scott Lerner, CEO

Investor contact:
KCSA strategic communication
Valter Pinto, Managing Director
Telephone: 212-896-1254
Valter@KCSA.com


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Pet food maker recalled 17 different brands of pet food – here’s the full list https://passpet.org/pet-food-maker-recalled-17-different-brands-of-pet-food-heres-the-full-list/ https://passpet.org/pet-food-maker-recalled-17-different-brands-of-pet-food-heres-the-full-list/#respond Mon, 19 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/pet-food-maker-recalled-17-different-brands-of-pet-food-heres-the-full-list/ A recall of pet food contaminated with high levels of the toxin affected nearly 20 different popular brands. The company behind the various food brands, Sunshine Mills, has already been forced to extend the recall once. Check your pet food with the specified lot codes to make sure you are not feeding your dog or […]]]>
  • A recall of pet food contaminated with high levels of the toxin affected nearly 20 different popular brands.
  • The company behind the various food brands, Sunshine Mills, has already been forced to extend the recall once.
  • Check your pet food with the specified lot codes to make sure you are not feeding your dog or cat with contaminated food.

A large pet food recall originally appeared over a month ago and was later expanded recently to include even more lot codes and new products. The booster is due to the presence of high levels of aflatoxin, which is produced by mold. Some level of aflatoxin in food is considered acceptable, but pet foods manufactured by Sunshine Mills, Inc. have been tested for higher than acceptable levels and therefore had to be recalled.

The company sells its food under a variety of brands, which makes the recall a bit difficult, as it’s not just one type of food you need to watch out for, but several. In fact, there are 20 different brands of pet food included in the recall, so let’s dive into the list.

Here is the full list of product brands included in the recall:

  1. Pet
  2. Heart farms
  3. Happy Life Paws
  4. Champion
  5. Field test
  6. Good dog
  7. Hunter’s Special
  8. Ancient glory
  9. Pet expert
  10. Principle Super Premium Natural Food for Dogs
  11. Retriever bites and bones
  12. river bed
  13. Pride of the athlete
  14. Germinate
  15. thrifty
  16. Best runner
  17. Mustaches and tails

If you happen to have any of these brands of dog or cat food in your home, you should go to the official FDA Recall Bulletin page and compare the lot codes and dates on the list. reminder with the bag (s) you purchased. For some brands, only one batch of food was recalled, while others, like the Old Glory brand, included more than a dozen batch codes, which is a lot of spoiled food.

If you are concerned that you have given your pet some of the contaminated food, the FDA has some very important symptom information you should look for:

Pets poisoned with aflatoxin may exhibit symptoms such as sluggishness, loss of appetite, vomiting, jaundice (yellowish tinge of eyes, gums or skin due to liver damage) and / or diarrhea. In some cases, this toxicity can lead to long term liver problems and / or death. Some pets suffer from liver damage without showing any symptoms. Pet owners whose pets have eaten the recalled products should contact their veterinarian, especially if they show signs of illness.

Since this recall has already been extended once, great care should be taken with these brands of pet food. It is possible – not necessarily likely, but possible – that the recall will be extended again. For now, it might be a good idea to simply rebrand until the company is absolutely certain that they are in control of this toxin contamination.


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As premium pet food brands enter the grocery store channel, sales increase https://passpet.org/as-premium-pet-food-brands-enter-the-grocery-store-channel-sales-increase/ https://passpet.org/as-premium-pet-food-brands-enter-the-grocery-store-channel-sales-increase/#respond Thu, 07 May 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/as-premium-pet-food-brands-enter-the-grocery-store-channel-sales-increase/ According to a new study from sales and marketing firm Acosta, shoppers primarily buy pet food from mass and pet retailers, and purchases for pet needs from several retailers are currents. “Pets are a Big Business” report provides insight into pet ownership by generation as well as purchasing habits and factors that drive pet food […]]]>

According to a new study from sales and marketing firm Acosta, shoppers primarily buy pet food from mass and pet retailers, and purchases for pet needs from several retailers are currents.

“Pets are a Big Business” report provides insight into pet ownership by generation as well as purchasing habits and factors that drive pet food decision making .

“Pet care is a fast growing $ 75 billion industry (including veterinary care), with pet food sales up more than 6% from last year Said Colin Stewart, Executive Vice President, Business Intelligence at Acosta. “With this growth, we are seeing spending behaviors shift to reflect simpler purchasing options and an increased interest in healthy options for their pets that include real, natural ingredients. As pet ownership continues to skyrocket, retailers are expected to capitalize on the growth of the industry by focusing on their competitive advantages and competing in all directions: price, assortment and convenience.

With this growth, spending behaviors are changing: Traditional retailers that sell pet products are still key, with $ 17 billion spent on pet food in these channels, but shoppers are rapidly changing their behaviors to reflect simpler options. In fact, 54% of Millennials have purchased pet food or supplies online, driven by the benefits of convenience, price, and assortment. Premium brands are also entering grocery stores and mass retailers, fueling growth while attracting shoppers with list prices.

The study noted that one in five pet owners changed their purchasing behaviors to reflect more convenient options. The top reasons Millennials switch to where they buy pets are convenience (49%), price (31%), and assortment (17%). “Switching brands is more common than switching retailers,” the report notes, “and dog owners who shop most often online are the least likely to change. “

Acosta

Acosta notes that pet owners primarily purchase pet food from mass and pet retailers, and that it is common to purchase pet products from multiple retailers. Thirty-two percent of dog owners said they shopped at four or more retailers.

AcostaBrick and Mortar of Pet Food.png

Over the past year, grocery retailers have increased their pet food dollars (+ 5%), while food sales for pet retailers are down (-1.7% ). “This is mainly because high-end brands are entering grocery stores,” Acosta said, “making it more convenient for pet owners to buy food there and saving them a trip. Another contributing factor is that pet food prices at grocery retailers are often comparable or lower than those at pet retailers. “

AcostaPet Food Brick and Mortar Trends.png

E-commerce is booming with 54% of Millennials buying food and supplies for their dogs online in the past year, and 45% of Millennials have done so for their cats. Compared to last year, online pet food sales are increasing, but penetration is low at 9%. Household penetration is declining in major physical channels.


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Understanding and Cultivating Consumer Confidence in Pet Food Brands https://passpet.org/understanding-and-cultivating-consumer-confidence-in-pet-food-brands/ https://passpet.org/understanding-and-cultivating-consumer-confidence-in-pet-food-brands/#respond Thu, 23 Apr 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/understanding-and-cultivating-consumer-confidence-in-pet-food-brands/ Asked about the factors influencing their purchases of dry pet food, 91% of consumers rated the reliability of the brand as important. Trust was only a second importance in their brand selection process. (The number one influencing factor was knowing that their pets will like the products they choose.) Losing the trust and loyalty of […]]]>

Asked about the factors influencing their purchases of dry pet food, 91% of consumers rated the reliability of the brand as important. Trust was only a second importance in their brand selection process. (The number one influencing factor was knowing that their pets will like the products they choose.)

Losing the trust and loyalty of their customers can be costly for pet food companies. So what is it that damages this trust? And most importantly, how can brands restore broken trust?

Here are some of the areas where businesses risk losing consumer confidence, along with opportunities to right the damage and build loyalty.

Inform, educate and communicate

Pet owners who don’t yet trust a business are unlikely to view the business as a beneficial and educational resource. They may approach an unknown brand with skepticism and seek secondary sources to verify that brand’s information. That’s why it’s important for brands to share external resources, such as scientific studies and nutritional research. It is a good way to educate consumers while supporting the claims and formulations of the products.

When it comes to or To educate, there are few specific sources that consumers trust the most for information on pet food and nutrition. The number one resource is veterinarians – 41% of consumers obtain their information from veterinary experts. Other popular sources include internet research (25%) and personal recommendations (breeders, trainers, pet store staff, friends and family, etc.).

Social media also plays an important role in providing consumers with useful information, but not through advertisements and promotional messages. Just being available online to answer comments and questions can go a long way in building trust and winning customers.

Social platforms are also a great place for storytelling and engagement efforts, whether it’s sharing the stories behind the food, highlighting authentic testimonials, or asking for comments, questions and pretty. photos of pets. Consumers who connect to pet food brands in this way are more likely to support their products.

Take a closer look at labels and packaging

For consumers, the choice between brands often comes down to what’s on the packaging. The problem is, 63% of pet owners thinks the information on pet food labels is misleading. And 47% find pet food labels difficult to understand. This allows pet food manufacturers to clean and simplify package labels, making it easy for consumers to recognize ingredients, learn where those ingredients come from, and find out why they’re important to the food industry. animal health.

Customer loyalty for pet food products also has a lot to do with the packaging itself. Convenience is highly valued by many pet owners – 82% are looking for well-packaged products that make their lives easier. They opt for packages that are easy to open, serve and reseal so they can feed their pets quickly and keep food cool. They also want tear-resistant and damage-resistant packaging, especially if they’d rather have pet food shipped. If they receive torn food bags or are unable to seal those bags securely after the meal, they will likely consider rebranding.

Finally, sustainability has become an important factor in the trust pet owners place in businesses – 65% of consumers trust more brands that use sustainable packaging.

Demonstrate a commitment to food security

Nothing hurts consumer confidence like pet food recalls, especially if these recalls have devastating consequences for animals and humans. This is why it is essential that pet food companies comply with food safety requirements, implement preventative protocols, develop recall and emergency plans, and be transparent with consumers on how which they ensure the safety of their products.

And, if addressed promptly and in an informative manner, an unexpected pet food safety issue shouldn’t cost a business its customers and reputation. In fact, a recall can be an opportunity for manufacturers to prove to pet owners that they can tackle a problem quickly and take action to prevent it from happening again.

Many pet owners treat their pets like family and want to know that what they are giving them is healthy, reliable and safe. Pet food brands that tick all of these boxes repeatedly will succeed in building a loyal and ever-growing following.


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Healthy pet food brands with natural and organic ingredients drive sales https://passpet.org/healthy-pet-food-brands-with-natural-and-organic-ingredients-drive-sales/ https://passpet.org/healthy-pet-food-brands-with-natural-and-organic-ingredients-drive-sales/#respond Mon, 17 Feb 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/healthy-pet-food-brands-with-natural-and-organic-ingredients-drive-sales/ The well-being goes to the dogs. Consumer demand for natural ingredients and clean food labels is spilling over into the pet market. Pet food sales are on the rise as owners buy refrigerated meals prepared without preservatives and loaded with whole foods like quinoa, broccoli, avocado, and other superfoods suitable for humans. Pet food startups […]]]>

The well-being goes to the dogs.

Consumer demand for natural ingredients and clean food labels is spilling over into the pet market. Pet food sales are on the rise as owners buy refrigerated meals prepared without preservatives and loaded with whole foods like quinoa, broccoli, avocado, and other superfoods suitable for humans.

Pet food startups are responding to concerns of dog owners about the health and well-being of their dog’s kitchen.

So dog food no longer means canned meat byproducts with unappetizing ingredients.

Premium Purina pet food, owned by Nestlé, drives revenue for the company’s packaged products category, and General Mills, which purchased premium pet food brand Blue Buffalo in 2018 , said in December that its sales of pet food had helped it balance slow sales of snacks and yogurt. last quarter, reported the Wall Street Journal.

And Nestlé bought a controlling stake in Tails.com, a UK-based subscription dog food service that tailors personalized meals to a pet’s dietary needs. The website asks owners about their pet’s favorite foods with prompts such as, “Do they prefer chicken or fish? Grain or not grain? And an algorithm will create a custom recipe mix of fiber, protein, and fat.

DOGS AND CATS COST OVER $ 72B TO AMERICANS IN 2018

The pet food market in the United States was worth around $ 24.6 billion in 2016 and is expected to grow by more than five billion to reach around $ 30 billion by 2022, according to the market research firm. Statista.com. Refrigerated pet food sales, meanwhile, only make up a small portion of the industry’s overall retail store sales at $ 323 million last year, according to research firm IRI. as reported by the New York Post.

Teleprinter Security Last Switch Switch %
NSRGY NESTLÉ SA 120.49 +0.28 + 0.23%
GIS GENERAL MILLS, INC. 60.62 +0.80 +1.34%

Certainly, pet owners between the ages of 18 and 34 model their pet food purchases based on their dietary preferences by opting for organic and natural ingredients. About 34% of millennials opt for all-natural pet foods and 21% prefer organic, according to market research firm Mintel, as reported by marketing agency Impact Group. In addition, up to 44% of pet food and products in North America did not contain any additives, according to the report.

Take Jinx Inc., a dog food start-up founded by alumni of Casper, the mattress brand, which brings a direct-to-consumer approach to healthy dog ​​food without artificial ingredients or fillers containing organic ingredients like fruits, vegetables and chicken. The company has raised $ 5.6 million in funding from investors such as Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian and Will Smith, TechCrunch reported.

ANIMAL STARTUPS RAINING CATS AND DOGS AS EXPENDITURE INCREASES

Consumers reflect their dietary preferences for natural and organic ingredients in what they buy for their pets, research shows.

Pet Plate, a New York-based delivery service that bills itself as “made with real ingredients in human-grade cuisine,” claims “no processed meats or by-products” for its varieties like “Lip Lickin ‘Lamb. “And” “Bark beef. The company has raised $ 6 million, the New York Post reported, and it costs around $ 10 a pound for food.

ANIMAL LOVERS COULD FUCK ON THIS INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

A number of restaurants and food chains have also increased their pet food offerings. Vegan chain By Chloe offers sugar-free bone-shaped dog treats and Pupcakes (Munchkins-shaped cakes) made with apple cider vinegar and unsweetened applesauce. And Shake Shack offers a “Woof” menu for dogs like its Bag o ‘Bones which includes a bag of five ShackBurger dog cookies.

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