Pet food advisor – Pass Pet http://passpet.org/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 22:28:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://passpet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg Pet food advisor – Pass Pet http://passpet.org/ 32 32 Financial adviser Bret Hrbek receives Edward Jones Spirit of Caring Award – Royal Examiner https://passpet.org/financial-adviser-bret-hrbek-receives-edward-jones-spirit-of-caring-award-royal-examiner/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 21:44:17 +0000 https://passpet.org/financial-adviser-bret-hrbek-receives-edward-jones-spirit-of-caring-award-royal-examiner/ Bethel Assembly of God (111 Totten Lane, Front Royal, VA 22630) was honored to host Sergeant Major (Retired US Army) James McGruder on Sunday, June 26e, 2022, for a very memorable flag presentation service. The service was hosted by church member and Warren County resident Tim Wolfe and was to coincide with the church’s annual […]]]>

Bethel Assembly of God (111 Totten Lane, Front Royal, VA 22630) was honored to host Sergeant Major (Retired US Army) James McGruder on Sunday, June 26e, 2022, for a very memorable flag presentation service. The service was hosted by church member and Warren County resident Tim Wolfe and was to coincide with the church’s annual Independence Day celebrations.

SGM McGruder entered the United States Army in February 1983 and completed basic and advanced individual training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. He received the MOS 13B Field Artillery. After basic training, he was posted to Fort Hood, Texas as part of the 1st 92nd Field Artillery, 8 Inch Battalion (BN).

Sergeant Major (Retired US Army) James McGruder

SGM McGruder deployed to Iraq with Alpha Battery 5-18 Field Artillery as part of Desert Shield/Storm in November 1990. While in Iraq he risked his life to put out a fire in a gate -M548 ammunition to save combat ammunition from the M110 howitzer. load; he took this step selflessly, without hesitation and without formal acknowledgment of his heroism.

SGM McGruder is passionate about mentoring and ensuring the future success of the NCO Corps. In 2003, as the Senior Professional Development NCO for the Field Artillery Branch in Human Resources Command (HRC), SGM McGruder managed over 24,000 troops and expertly advised the Chief of the Branch and the Sergeant Major on military education requirements, career progression and the structure of military occupational specialties. . While posted to HRC, SGM McGruder was selected from over 26 non-commissioned officers to fill the position of Human Resources Command Chairman Sergeant Audie Murphy Club.

SGM McGruder was also instrumental in the development of young officers. In July 2009, SGM McGruder was selected by the CSM of Cadet Command to serve as Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3, United States Army Cadet Command, Fort Monroe, Virginia. His selfless service and dedication to mission accomplishment had a lasting impact on training operations and opportunities throughout the command.

On August 7, 2014, SGM McGruder had the privilege of introducing former President Barrack Obama before he signed the Veterans Affairs Overhaul Bill into law. That bill enacted a $16.3 billion measure to help overhaul the Department of Veterans Affairs, the agency that in recent months had come under heavy criticism for long wait times for health care and record handling. It was the first time in American history that an active duty sergeant major introduced a sitting president.

SGM McGruder’s last assignment was to Fort Belvoir Garrison Operations, where he served as an enlisted advisor to the Garrison Commander. After more than 32 years of military service, SGM McGruder retired on February 28, 2015. SGM McGruder is married to former Tammy Buerl and they have been married for 34 years. They have two children, daughter Jamecia and son James.

The Flag Presentation Service honored Pastor Steven A. Schemom II for his dedication to the community. Bethel Assembly of God is a growing, community-minded church working to positively impact the Front Royal-Warren County community with the gospel of Jesus Christ. As an example of its dedication to the community, the church is currently working to distribute gift bags to employees and volunteers of community organizations to show their appreciation and support for the hard work these people do in the community.

Weekly services are held at Bethel Assembly of God every Sunday at 10:30 a.m. The church also hosts or sponsors several small groups each week. The mission of the church is “to be a vital community of loving disciples committed to building one another so that everyone may reach their full potential”. More information about the church can be found online at www.bethellife.org or by emailing info@bethellife.org.



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Americans are opening record number of credit cards as inflation rises https://passpet.org/americans-are-opening-record-number-of-credit-cards-as-inflation-rises/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 10:46:16 +0000 https://passpet.org/americans-are-opening-record-number-of-credit-cards-as-inflation-rises/ Image source: Getty Images As Americans grapple with the highest inflation in 40 years, the number of new credit card surged as more Americans rely on them to meet high prices. According to a recent Federal Reserve report, revolving credit (credit cards and lines of credit) grew 19.6% year over year to $1.103 billion. This […]]]>

Image source: Getty Images

As Americans grapple with the highest inflation in 40 years, the number of new credit card surged as more Americans rely on them to meet high prices. According to a recent Federal Reserve report, revolving credit (credit cards and lines of credit) grew 19.6% year over year to $1.103 billion. This is an all-time high, breaking the pre-COVID-19 record of $1.092 trillion in 2019. Credit card debt fell to $974.6 billion in 2020 and has been steadily rising. increase since.

New credit cards are on the rise

According to an Equifax survey, Americans received 11.5 million new bank credit cards through February 2022. This is a 31.4% increase from the previous year. Total limits for these credit cards were $55.5 billion, a 59.2% increase over the previous year. Total credit limits now stand at $4.12 trillion, $224 billion above the pre-pandemic level.

Credit card balances fell by $15 billion according to the Federal Reserve’s quarterly report on household debt and credit. This is common as people pay off their credit cards starting around the holiday season. However, that’s $71 billion more than the first-quarter 2021 sales, which is a big year-over-year increase.

Mortgage and auto loan balances push up total household debt

Household debt at the end of the first quarter of 2022 increased by $266 billion, or 1.7% more than in the previous quarter. Total household debt reached $15.84 trillion, $1.7 trillion more than at the end of 2019, just before the pandemic. Mortgages increased by $250 billion and auto loans by $11 billion.

While mortgage and auto loan balances increased, the number of new loans declined in the first quarter of 2022. New mortgage loans, including refinancing loans, reached $859 billion. That’s still $197 billion more than the quarter just before the pandemic hit. Data shows that Americans are using their credit cards more and taking out fewer mortgages as they need to borrow more due to high inflation and react to rising interest rates.

Mortgages are by far the largest component of household debt at 71%. The second-largest component of household debt is student loans, which stood at $1.59 trillion, up $14 billion from the previous quarter. The Fed report shows consumers are relying more on credit cards as high inflation has dramatically increased the cost of everything from food and gas to housing. Americans are taking on less mortgage and auto loan debt as the Fed raised interest rates to the highest since 2009.

Check out The Ascent’s best credit cards for 2022

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The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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Nordea Investment Management AB buys 2,642 shares of Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ: CENTA) https://passpet.org/nordea-investment-management-ab-buys-2642-shares-of-central-garden-pet-nasdaq-centa/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 08:19:42 +0000 https://passpet.org/nordea-investment-management-ab-buys-2642-shares-of-central-garden-pet-nasdaq-centa/ Nordea Investment Management AB increased its position in shares of Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENTA – Get Rating) by 1.6% in the first quarter, according to the company in its latest 13F filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The institutional investor held 169,425 shares of the company after purchasing an additional 2,642 shares during […]]]>

Nordea Investment Management AB increased its position in shares of Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENTA – Get Rating) by 1.6% in the first quarter, according to the company in its latest 13F filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The institutional investor held 169,425 shares of the company after purchasing an additional 2,642 shares during the period. Nordea Investment Management AB’s holdings in Central Garden & Pet were worth $7,029,000 at the end of the last reporting period.

Other hedge funds have also recently increased or reduced their stakes in the company. Advisor Group Holdings Inc. increased its equity stake in Central Garden & Pet by 49.7% during the 4th quarter. Advisor Group Holdings Inc. now owns 1,726 shares of the company worth $82,000 after buying 573 additional shares in the last quarter. Profund Advisors LLC acquired a new stock position in Central Garden & Pet during Q4 for a value of approximately $215,000. Everhart Financial Group Inc. acquired a new position in shares of Central Garden & Pet during Q4 worth approximately $305,000. Teacher Retirement System of Texas increased its stake in shares of Central Garden & Pet by 21.3% during the 4th quarter. Teacher Retirement System of Texas now owns 7,853 shares of the company worth $376,000 after buying 1,379 additional shares in the last quarter. Finally, Wellington Management Group LLP increased its equity stake in Central Garden & Pet by 65.5% during the third quarter. Wellington Management Group LLP now owns 10,238 shares of the company worth $440,000 after purchasing an additional 4,053 shares in the last quarter. Hedge funds and other institutional investors own 68.74% of the company’s shares.

In other Central Garden & Pet news, Chief Financial Officer Nicholas Lahanas sold 7,306 shares of the company in a trade that took place on Friday, May 13. The shares were sold at an average price of $41.78, for a total transaction of $305,244.68. Following the completion of the sale, the CFO now directly owns 113,520 shares of the company, valued at $4,742,865.60. The sale was disclosed in a document filed with the Securities & Exchange Commission, which is available at this hyperlink. Insiders of the company own 20.28% of the shares of the company.

A number of stock analysts have recently commented on CENTA shares. StockNews.com began covering Central Garden & Pet stocks in a research note on Thursday, March 31. They set a “holding” rating for the company. JPMorgan Chase & Co. raised its price target on shares of Central Garden & Pet from $47.00 to $49.00 in a Thursday, April 14 research note. Finally, KeyCorp cut its price target on Central Garden & Pet shares from $62.00 to $56.00 and set an “overweight” rating for the company in a research note on Thursday.

Shares of NASDAQ:CENTA opened at $40.61 on Friday. Central Garden & Pet has a 52-week low of $37.56 and a 52-week high of $52.04. The company has a market capitalization of $2.24 billion, a P/E ratio of 14.82 and a beta of 0.57. The company has a 50-day simple moving average of $41.18 and a 200-day simple moving average of $42.65. The company has a debt ratio of 0.92, a quick ratio of 1.29 and a current ratio of 2.85.

Central Garden & Pet Inc (NASDAQ:CENTA – Get Rating) last released quarterly earnings data on Wednesday, May 4. The company reported earnings per share (EPS) of $1.27 for the quarter, beating the consensus estimate of $1.18 by $0.09. The company posted revenue of $954.37 million in the quarter, versus a consensus estimate of $935.14 million. Central Garden & Pet had a net margin of 4.48% and a return on equity of 12.18%. As a group, stock analysts expect Central Garden & Pet to post earnings per share of 2.75 for the current year.

About Central Garden & Pet (Get a rating)

Central Garden & Pet Company produces and distributes various products for the lawn and garden and pet supply markets in the United States. It operates through two segments, Pet and Garden. The Pets segment provides dog and cat supplies, such as dog treats and chews, toys, pet beds and grooming products, waste management and training mats, and pet containment devices; supplies for aquatic animals, small animals, reptiles and pet birds, including toys, cages and habitats, bedding, food and supplements; animal and household health and insect control products; live fish and products for fish, reptiles and other aquarium pets, such as aquariums, furniture and fixtures, pumps, filters, water conditioners, foods and supplements; and products for horses and livestock, as well as outdoor cushions and pillows.

See also

Want to see which other hedge funds hold CENTA? Visit HoldingsChannel.com for the latest 13F filings and insider trading for Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ: CENTA – Get Rating).

Institutional ownership by quarter for Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENTA)



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Citizen Tribeca | The 2022 Candidates: Danyela Souza Egorov for State Senate District 27 https://passpet.org/citizen-tribeca-the-2022-candidates-danyela-souza-egorov-for-state-senate-district-27/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 22:18:41 +0000 https://passpet.org/citizen-tribeca-the-2022-candidates-danyela-souza-egorov-for-state-senate-district-27/ The primary for the state Senate and Congress is now August 23, and in the coming weeks I will be speaking to candidates for both. I asked them to respond to the TCQ&A so they could add their own words. This is the first in the series for State Senate District 27. As a mother […]]]>

The primary for the state Senate and Congress is now August 23, and in the coming weeks I will be speaking to candidates for both. I asked them to respond to the TCQ&A so they could add their own words. This is the first in the series for State Senate District 27.

As a mother of two school-aged children, Danyela Souza Egorov was appalled at how children were being treated during the pandemic. She and her husband moved to Tribeca seven years ago, largely to use PS 234, and coronavirus politics have pushed her to run for office.

“I could go to the gym, I could go to a restaurant, but my son couldn’t go to school,” she said. “Professional athletes could play without vaccines, but child athletes could not. When I reviewed the options for applicants, no one had done work on behalf of our children during the pandemic.

Danyela worked for a charter school association for a decade while living in California, then moved here to work for a Sunset Park charter, which focused on children who didn’t speak English at home. She is now a strategy advisor for the New York Charter School Association and was elected in July 2021 to the District 2 Community Education Council.

At CEC meetings, friends started asking her if she would consider running for office, and the idea caught on. She had already seen how children had lost a year of education and the resulting gaps in learning, especially for low-income children. “Any elementary school principal will tell you that children don’t learn to read at the same age.”

And as an immigrant from Brazil, Danyela was used to street violence. Every time she left her home there, she said, getting mugged was a possibility. So when she felt the same fear here in New York, she added public safety to her platform. And its two big problems are linked: children say they don’t feel safe and there has been a massive increase in weapons collected from schools.

“The most affected communities are also low-income ones,” she notes. “We must fight for public safety, and we must also fight for justice.”

Danyela came here to attend Harvard’s Kennedy School for Public Policy – ​​just one step in a life built around education. Her mother grew up very poor in Brazil, but she had access to a specialized program as a high school student and went to college for fun when Danyela was a teenager. “I’ve always been very passionate about education,” she said. “It opened so many doors for me.”

……………………………….

1. How long have you lived in the neighborhood? where are you moving from? Where are you from?
I’ve lived in the neighborhood for 7 years, we moved here from CA because we missed the city and wanted to be close with friends. I grew up in Brazil.

2. Married? In partnership ? If so, what is his name and occupation?
Married to Dimitri Egorov, he works in the financial sector.

3. Children? Pets?
I have two boys: Dennis who is 9 years old and Max who is 4 years old. We have a beagle named Urso (meaning bear in Portuguese) and he is 12 years old.

4. Where do you live?
I live in Tribeca

5. What do you do for a living? Or, what did you do before deciding to run for this position?
I have worked with education for over a decade because education has been my passport to a better life. I have helped educators open schools and families find the best school for their children. I am currently vice-president of CEC D2.

6. What are the top three issues you will tackle if you win the election?
My priorities will be public safety (changing the bail reform law), closing the learning gaps caused by the pandemic, and making NYC business and investment friendly.

7. Who is the first person you will hire – or rather what is the first position you will fill?
Chief of staff for sure!

8. What are the three most important issues for New Yorkers right now?
Public safety, education and economy

9. What do you think is the most important thing to help the district recover from the pandemic?
Bail Reform Act amended to stop allowing repeat offenders to commit further crimes. Until we tackle soaring crime, we won’t be able to revive the economy and families will continue to leave town.

10. Why are you standing for election? What do you hope to change, or do better?
I’m running because I love NYC and couldn’t sit on the sidelines while our reps do nothing to address the real issues in our neighborhood. I was also appalled at how NY treated our children during the pandemic, they were at the bottom of our reps’ priority list.

11. The busiest restaurants: Greca – love the food and it’s near my house

15. We usually order pizza from Gigino Trattoria on Sunday night, my kids love the pepperoni pizza.

17. I’m so happy Laughing Man is in the neighborhood because without it I wouldn’t have a place to schedule meetings

18. How I stay in shape: Running after my children and my dog

21. A recent enthusiasm: My husband is from Kharkiv, Ukraine, and his grandparents, who are 85, eventually fled to Poland at the end of March. I cannot tell you the joy we felt knowing that they are safe and that they will hopefully be able to come and live out their final years with us.

22. Rainy day activity: Watch movies at home or head to Barnes & Nobles for books

33. I bring people from outside:Broadway

34. What is your favorite park in town? We love Teardrop Park. The water play area in the summer is a hit with my boys.


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CofC introduces and welcomes new staff https://passpet.org/cofc-introduces-and-welcomes-new-staff/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 15:33:55 +0000 https://passpet.org/cofc-introduces-and-welcomes-new-staff/ The College of Charleston family continues to grow with the addition of these new staff members. While not necessarily new to campus, these Cougars have found exciting new roles at the College, and we’re excited to hear about them! Please welcome the following employees (listed alphabetically below) to the family! Matthew Agostosa-Viado, Information Technology Matthieu […]]]>

The College of Charleston family continues to grow with the addition of these new staff members. While not necessarily new to campus, these Cougars have found exciting new roles at the College, and we’re excited to hear about them! Please welcome the following employees (listed alphabetically below) to the family!

Matthew Agostosa-Viado, Information Technology

Matthieu Agostosa-Viado
Endpoint Engineer, Information Technology Division

Background: I am originally from North Charleston, SC. Since then, I’ve lived in Arizona, Virginia, and Washington, DC I went to The Citadel, South Carolina’s Military College, where I studied Computer Science. Prior to working at the College of Charleston, I worked as a software developer in Washington, DC, and for a moving company here in Charleston.

Interests: I like to surf weekends on Folly, as well as skateboarding here in downtown Charleston. I love playing the cello and am currently Diamond in League of Legends.

Looking forward: I look forward to working with faculty and staff to create a supportive learning environment for future American leaders.

Kaylee Lass

Kaylee Lass, Halsey Institute

Kaylee Lass ’16
Director of Exhibitions, Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

Background: I grew up in Southampton County, Virginia, subconsciously absorbing an appreciation for contemporary art and historical artifacts from the treasury of a home of my grandparents. It was in this rural community that I began to learn the power of place and material culture to share stories. I carried that sensibility with me here at the College of Charleston to study Arts Management and Historic Preservation and Community Planning. As an intern at the Halsey Institute in my final year, I was captivated by the interactions with gallery visitors at reception and the new meaning our conversations could bring to the exhibits. After graduation, I was hired as Assistant Director and Chief Curator and have held various positions at the Halsey Institute since, attending nearly 40 exhibitions by 100 artists. It was such a joy to grow and give back to the place that gave me so much.

Interests: When I’m not in the galleries, you can find me in the dance studio, enjoying art and music around town, taking walks in the golden hour, or running after the sun goes down with friends.

Looking forward: I look forward to working more closely with the artists we bring to the Charleston community, helping their visions become reality in our space, and witnessing the “aha!” moments of students and visitors walking through the galleries.

Webb Maynard

Webb Maynard, Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs

Webb Maynard
Data File Coordinator, Office of Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs

Background: I was born and raised in Conway, SC. I used to work in hotels before attending CofC to complete my BA in Art History.

Interests: I am an adventurer. I love going out and finding new places to eat and taking long car trips with my loved ones. I have a dog named Morgan that I raised from a puppy. I like to read a little. I’m also a big nerd who likes to play Dungeons & Dragons every week with my friends.

Looking forward: I have always enjoyed helping people even in some mundane parts of life. So, working for CofC, I help students young and old achieve their graduation dreams and guide them through the financial aspect of it.

Ana Montjoy

Ana Montjoy, Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs

Ana Montjoy
Alternative Loans and External Bursaries Program Coordinator, Office of Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs

Background: I grew up about 45 minutes west of Charleston, just outside of Walterboro, SC. I earned my BA in Integrated Marketing Communications with a minor in History from Winthrop University and earned my MBA from UofSC Aiken. I started working at a regional UofSC campus in 2014. After several years of admission, I made the transition to financial aid and really benefited from it. I have been heavily involved with SCASFAA (Student Financial Aid Administrators Association of South Carolina) since 2018 and have come to rely on my friends and colleagues across the state to help me stay au familiar with federal regulations, as they change often.

Interests: I love to travel, play “aunt” with all my friends’ kids, swim, hang out with my cat, do puzzles, listen to music, write, and catch the occasional stingray game…even when I don’t have no idea what’s going on!

Looking forward: I look forward to learning and growing with a team that is always ready to help the next student in line.

Katie O'Neill

Katie O’Neill, Academic Advisor

Katie O’Neill
Educational Advisor, Center for Educational Counseling and Planning

Background: I’m originally from Mobile, Alabama but grew up in Boise, Idaho where I competed in snow skiing competitions. Prior to coming to the College of Charleston, I worked as a graduate assistant and academic certification officer for the Veterans Affairs Office at the University of South Alabama in Mobile while completing my Masters in Educational Leadership for Higher Education. .

Interests: I picked up a new hobby to learn more about the Charleston area by visiting local restaurants and exploring the area. I love exploring new places! I make it a goal every weekend to try at least one new place to eat or one new place to visit. I definitely have a preference for supporting local places over chains. I also enjoy spending time with my family and friends whenever I can. On the weekends, I like to unwind by reading a book, catching up on a binge-worthy show on Netflix, finding a sports game to watch, and skiing in the winter.

Looking forward: I am delighted to help students navigate their academic schedules and support them in their academic goals at the College of Charleston. I look forward to working with my new team at the Center for Academic Guidance and Planning – it’s awesome and so encouraging. I couldn’t do it without their help and advice! I also look forward to attending some sporting events like basketball and football and look forward to bonding with other faculty and staff on campus.

Michael Stewart

Michael Stewart, Human Resources

Michael Stewart
Talent Acquisition and Development Coordinator, Office of Human Resources

Background: I’m from Taylors, SC. I graduated from the University of South Carolina with a BA in Multimedia Journalism and an M.Ed in Higher Education and Student Affairs. While in school, I worked as an academic coach and tutor for student-athletes.

Interests: I love running, going to the movies, traveling, spending time in nature and watching baseball. I am passionate about protecting the environment and helping endangered species.

Looking forward: I look forward to taking on a new challenge and joining a great team. I can’t wait to bring everything I can to the table for CofC!

Laura Tyndall

Laura Tyndall, Registrar

Laura Tyndall
Military Transfer Assessment Manager, Office of the Registrar

Background: I grew up just across the Cooper River in Mount Pleasant, SC. I started my career in higher education as an undergraduate work-study at Charleston Southern University. I continued at CSU, working in admissions and financial aid for nearly a decade before moving to Bluffton to work in the Registrar’s Office at UofSC Beaufort. After five years away, I decided it was time to return home and start my next chapter with CofC.

Interests: I love all the natural beauty our Lowcountry has to offer. You will often find me hammocking between two trees with a book or listening to music and enjoying the scenery. I also enjoy a good walk on the beach or along the Pitt Street Bridge at sunset. I love having a good road trip with friends, or just being with family in the mountains of North Carolina or in the distant country of Thailand! I love traveling to all tropical places!

Looking forward: I look forward to working in a great institution full of tradition. I also enjoy helping students achieve their goals.

Regan Wacker

Regan Wacker, CofC Libraries

Regan Wacker’18
Access and Instruction Specialist, College of Charleston Libraries

Background: I grew up in Florida and graduated from CofC. I have lived here in Charleston since graduating in 2018.

Interests: I like to take long walks, read and cook vegetarian meals.

Looking forward: I will enjoy the sense of community and work in a wonderful library.

Asia Williams

Asia Williams, Addlestone Library

Asia Williams ’22
Access and Instruction Specialist, Marlene and Nathan Addlestone Library

Background: I’m from Anderson, SC! I am a recent 2022 graduate of the College, where I majored in History and worked as a Peer Academic Advisor within the freshman IMPACT program.

Interests: In my free time, I enjoy practicing yoga, trying new foods, taking long walks downtown, and finding things to do with my friends and family!

Looking forward: I look forward to enjoying the positive and fun atmosphere that the College, students, faculty and staff have created!


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Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENT) Updates Fiscal 2022 Earnings Guidance https://passpet.org/central-garden-pet-nasdaqcent-updates-fiscal-2022-earnings-guidance/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 14:25:59 +0000 https://passpet.org/central-garden-pet-nasdaqcent-updates-fiscal-2022-earnings-guidance/ Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENT – Get Rating) updated its earnings guidance for fiscal 2022 on Wednesday. The company provided EPS guidance of $2.75 for the period, compared to the estimate consensus EPS of $3.11. The company released a revenue forecast of -. Shares of CENT rose $0.33 on Wednesday, hitting $42.28. The stock recorded […]]]>

Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENT – Get Rating) updated its earnings guidance for fiscal 2022 on Wednesday. The company provided EPS guidance of $2.75 for the period, compared to the estimate consensus EPS of $3.11. The company released a revenue forecast of -.

Shares of CENT rose $0.33 on Wednesday, hitting $42.28. The stock recorded trading volume of 1,353 shares, compared to an average trading volume of 37,871 shares. The company has a 50-day moving average of $43.97 and a 200-day moving average of $46.08. The stock has a market capitalization of $2.33 billion, a price-earnings ratio of 15.31 and a beta of 0.54. The company has a debt ratio of 0.92, a current ratio of 2.85 and a quick ratio of 1.29. Central Garden & Pet has a 12-month low of $40.03 and a 12-month high of $57.32.

Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENT – Get Rating) last reported results on Wednesday, May 4. The company reported earnings per share of $1.27 for the quarter, beating analyst consensus estimates of $1.18 by $0.09. The company posted revenue of $954.37 million in the quarter, versus analyst estimates of $935.14 million. Central Garden & Pet had a net margin of 4.48% and a return on equity of 12.18%. As a group, research analysts expect Central Garden & Pet to post earnings per share of 3.14 for the current fiscal year.

Separately, Truist Financial lowered its price target on shares of Central Garden & Pet from $65.00 to $60.00 in a Tuesday, March 22 report.

Separately, CFO Nicholas Lahanas sold 7,306 shares of the company in a trade dated Friday, May 13. The stock was sold at an average price of $41.78, for a total value of $305,244.68. Following the completion of the transaction, the CFO now owns 113,520 shares of the company, valued at $4,742,865.60. The transaction was disclosed in a document filed with the SEC, accessible via this hyperlink. Insiders hold 8.80% of the shares of the company.

Hedge funds have recently changed their stakes in the company. Advisor Group Holdings Inc. increased its stake in shares of Central Garden & Pet by 43.5% during the first quarter. Advisor Group Holdings Inc. now owns 2,176 shares of the company valued at $96,000 after purchasing an additional 660 shares in the last quarter. The Swiss National Bank increased its stake in Central Garden & Pet by 7.1% in the first quarter. The Swiss National Bank now owns 22,750 shares of the company worth $1,000,000 after buying an additional 1,500 shares last quarter. Bank of New York Mellon Corp increased its stake in Central Garden & Pet by 1.6% in the first quarter. Bank of New York Mellon Corp now owns 110,564 shares of the company worth $4,862,000 after buying 1,758 additional shares last quarter. Citigroup Inc. increased its stake in Central Garden & Pet by 9.0% in the first quarter. Citigroup Inc. now owns 14,464 shares of the company worth $636,000 after buying 1,189 more shares in the last quarter. Finally, MetLife Investment Management LLC increased its stake in Central Garden & Pet by 6.4% in the first quarter. MetLife Investment Management LLC now owns 4,731 shares of the company worth $208,000 after buying 285 additional shares in the last quarter. Institutional investors and hedge funds hold 18.59% of the company’s shares.

Central Garden & Pet Company Profile (Get a rating)

Central Garden & Pet Company produces and distributes various products for the lawn and garden and pet supply markets in the United States. It operates through two segments, Pet and Garden. The Pets segment provides dog and cat supplies, such as dog treats and chews, toys, pet beds and grooming products, waste management and training mats, and pet containment devices; supplies for aquatic animals, small animals, reptiles and pet birds, including toys, cages and habitats, bedding, food and supplements; animal and household health and insect control products; live fish and products for fish, reptiles and other aquarium pets, such as aquariums, furniture and fixtures, pumps, filters, water conditioners, foods and supplements; and products for horses and livestock, as well as outdoor cushions and pillows.

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Earnings History and Estimates for Central Garden & Pet (NASDAQ:CENT)

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The smartest dividend stock to buy with $20 right now https://passpet.org/the-smartest-dividend-stock-to-buy-with-20-right-now/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/the-smartest-dividend-stock-to-buy-with-20-right-now/ My selecting a stock trading at less than $20 per share and showing considerable long-term growth potential is Agricultural partners (NYSE: REIT). This company is organized as a real estate investment trust (REIT) and focuses on – you guessed it – farmland, particularly in the United States. On Friday, its stock closed at $14.11. Farmland […]]]>

My selecting a stock trading at less than $20 per share and showing considerable long-term growth potential is Agricultural partners (NYSE: REIT). This company is organized as a real estate investment trust (REIT) and focuses on – you guessed it – farmland, particularly in the United States. On Friday, its stock closed at $14.11.

Farmland Partners is one of only two publicly traded farmland REITs. Gladstone Land is the other.

Before we dive in, a word of warning: while it’s possible to find some relatively unknown gems among low-priced stocks, overall this space tends to be quite risky.

Image source: Getty Images.

Why invest in REITs?

Real estate investment trusts are attractive because they tend to pay strong dividends. In exchange for the special tax treatment they receive, they are required to pay out at least 90% of their annual income in the form of dividends.

Farmland Partners’ dividend currently yields around 1.7%. That’s pretty low for REITs, but the stock might suit investors more concerned with long-term capital appreciation than current income.

Why invest in US farmland?

In my view, prime US farmland is poised to increase significantly in value over the long term, due to supply and demand dynamics.

The supply of arable land is expected to decrease over time due to continued development and climate change, which leads to an increase in the frequency of severe droughts in this country and around the world. In contrast, demand for crops grown on farmland is expected to continue to grow. The world’s population is growing and more and more people in developing countries are entering the middle class.

Additionally, the pandemic and the Russian invasion of Ukraine have underscored the benefits for companies (and entire countries) of having domestic supply chains. This is especially true when it comes to supply chains for essential goods and products, such as food.

The current high inflation environment is another reason why now is a good time to consider investing in farmland, which investors can do by buying shares in a farmland REIT. Investments in physical assets tend to outperform those in other categories when inflation is high.

Farmland Partners activity and key statistics

Farmland Partners, which went public in 2014, buys high-quality US farmland that it leases to farmers to grow a variety of crops. It also provides auction, brokerage and third-party farm management services.

The company’s portfolio included approximately 160,700 acres of owned farmland and 25,000 acres of managed farmland in 19 states, as of the end of the first quarter. With over 100 tenants and 26 types of crops grown on its farms, the company has good geographical, tenant and crop diversity. The portfolio vacancy was 0%.

Company Market capitalization Dividend yield Futures Price/AFFO* Based on 2022 Company Forecast 2022 Year-to-Date Total Equity Return 5-year total stock return
Agricultural partners $706 million 1.7% 50 to 64** 18.5% 83.8%
S&P 500 Index 1.59% (22.3) 65.2%

Data sources: Yahoo! Finance and YCharts. Data as of June 17, 2022. *AFFO = adjusted funds from operations (FFO). FFO is like “earnings” for REITs; it is the primary driver of shareholder payouts and adds items such as depreciation and amortization to net income. **Calculated by the author.

Last month, the company announced that it was increasing its quarterly dividend by 20% to $0.06. CEO Paul Pittman attributed the increase to “strong earnings growth, significant asset appreciation, reduced [debt] leverage, and better visibility of expenses resulting from the dismissal of the class action litigation.

This dividend hike is the first since 2018. The 20% increase suggests management is very confident about the company’s future profitability performance.

Shares of Farmland Partners are trading between 50 and 64 times the AFFO 2022 range for which management has guided. This is a relatively high valuation, but attractive stocks are rarely cheap.

Finally, investors can expect some cyclicality with a farmland REIT, as there is cyclicality with agricultural commodity prices, which are currently at or near historic highs. However, the long-term trend will be up for these commodities for the supply and demand reasons discussed, in my opinion. If this thesis proves to be correct, the shares of Farmland Partners should be winners in the long term.

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BA McKenna has no position in the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool fills positions and recommends Farmland Partners and Gladstone Land. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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MCLA welcomes Maple The Comfort Dog / iBerkshires.com https://passpet.org/mcla-welcomes-maple-the-comfort-dog-iberkshires-com/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/mcla-welcomes-maple-the-comfort-dog-iberkshires-com/ The organization donated the poodle, which was bred to be hypoallergenic. Berkshire Comfort Dogs trains and grooms the dog for free. “A dog is donated by Berkshire Poodles, which is $3,500. Then the average annual cost for dogs with vet bills, training, and grooming is $2,000 a year,” Kohlenberger said. Fortunately, Hilltowns Veterinary Clinic veterinarian […]]]>

The organization donated the poodle, which was bred to be hypoallergenic. Berkshire Comfort Dogs trains and grooms the dog for free.

“A dog is donated by Berkshire Poodles, which is $3,500. Then the average annual cost for dogs with vet bills, training, and grooming is $2,000 a year,” Kohlenberger said.

Fortunately, Hilltowns Veterinary Clinic veterinarian Sharon M. Lynch is volunteering her time. But with the growing popularity of nonprofit organizations, Berkshire Comfort Dogs is reaching out to other Berkshires veterinary clinics to donate their services.

On May 31, the school announced it was getting a comfort dog and asked students, faculty, staff and alumni to vote for its name. The options were Juno, Maisel and Maple. Maple won by an overwhelming majority with more than 100 people voting in favor of the name.

Finally the litter was born and 8 weeks after the additional 63 day gestation period, Hantman was able to pick her up last week.

In the past, MCLA has hosted events that included animals to help reduce student stress, including student-favorite Barn Babies. These types of events would receive a high number of participants before the pandemic. Hantman said MCLA is thrilled to be able to provide this new resource to its students.

“The [Student Activities Council] does barn babies every year which is always a huge hit as well. So I’m sure those kinds of things will happen,” Hantman said. “And we’re working on more volunteer opportunities through our office with the Berkshire Humane Society and things like that. So there has been student interest in it. »

Over the next year, Maple will complete three training courses. She will follow this training alongside her litter brothers and sisters.

“These dogs are not trained as highly as service dogs, but they are trained much higher than emotional support animals and things like that,” Kohlenberger said.

Until she completes her training, Hantman will be with her at events, during the Maple period, and whenever students interact with her.

Following her training, students will be able to disconnect her so they can interact with her without Hantman, which will open up her availability since students won’t be restricted to her schedule.

Riello said they saw major support from faculty for this new addition and felt it would help students’ mental health, especially after surviving a pandemic.

“There’s like one or two people who might not be dogs, but even they see the benefits to the students and the community and are on board,” Hantman added.

MCLA Senior and Student Government Association President Ian Crombie said Maple’s presence on campus will also inform students with mental health issues of counseling and other resources the school already offers.

“We have free therapy resources on campus, but I think a lot of students are a little scared to take advantage of them, because they’re scared to talk to someone about how they’re feeling. So I think that having the dog would hurt them in the doorway a bit. To be able to feel comfortable going up to people,” Crombie said.

Crombie also noted that he felt more motivated to come to the office in the morning because he gets to see her.

Maple’s impact on campus has already been felt by SGA students who are on campus this summer for orientation. SGA students were introduced to Maple Wednesday early.

MCLA Junior Irving Mogene stepped out of his comfort zone and interacted with Maple despite being scared at first. After Maple was passed on to his peers, he asked to hold it and received presentations on how to do so safely. As he held Maple in his arms, she fell asleep and he began to warm up to her. Although he was hesitant at first to hold her when he put her down, he wanted a few more seconds.

Mogene said he thinks Maple’s presence on campus will help people get out of their comfort zone, as it encourages shy, dog-loving students to come to Maple and interact with their peers who also love dogs. Maple.

MCLA is not the only school to welcome these comfort dogs on campus, other organizations such as the Pittsfield Police Department, Pittsfield Public Schools, Boys and Girls Club and 15 other organizations have also gone through this. not.


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Dogs can help reduce stress in children https://passpet.org/dogs-can-help-reduce-stress-in-children/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 20:22:39 +0000 https://passpet.org/dogs-can-help-reduce-stress-in-children/ Share on PinterestExperts say spending time with dogs can help reduce stress levels in children. Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images In a new study, researchers claim that interactions with dogs help lower stress hormone levels in children. Experts say owning a dog can also help teach children responsibility and social interaction. They note, however, that parents should […]]]>

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Experts say spending time with dogs can help reduce stress levels in children. Daniela Jovanovska-Hristovska/Getty Images
  • In a new study, researchers claim that interactions with dogs help lower stress hormone levels in children.
  • Experts say owning a dog can also help teach children responsibility and social interaction.
  • They note, however, that parents should consider the financial and time commitments of having a dog.

Spending time with dogs can help reduce stress in children.

It’s according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The study looked at stress levels in children in the UK before and after spending 20 minutes with a trained dog and a professional dog handler. The sessions took place twice a week for four weeks.

The results were compared to a control group of children who didn’t spend time with dogs and a group who practiced meditation instead.

The researchers said that children who spent time with dogs had significantly lower cortisol (stress hormone) levels after their interactions than either the control group or the meditation group. This was the case in both mainstream and special schools.

The researchers said that dog interventions can successfully reduce stress levels in school children, but they also point out that more research is needed to determine the optimal time spent with dogs to reduce stress.

The results of the new study match the findings of previous research.

A 2018 literature review reported that dogs provide stress relief and social support in terms of increased social interaction, alleviation of loneliness and depression, and possibly increased physical activity. .

Andrea Dorn, MSW, clinical social worker, author of When Someone Dies: A Practical Guide for Children to Grief and Lossand mother of two boys, suggests that the latest research confirms that there are significant benefits of exposing children to dogs to reduce stress.

Dorn told Healthline that exposing children to healthy, good-natured dogs can provide several other stress-busting benefits.

They include the following:

  • Positive, loyal and unconditional love and connection (i.e. a sense of belonging).
  • Important lessons about caregiving, which can build confidence and a sense of self-confidence.
  • An avenue to focus outside of yourself, providing a distraction from stress and anxiety.
  • Increase in social skills and decrease in behavioral problems.
  • A sense of security that can make children feel safe.
  • Stimulation and regulation of the sensory and nervous system by stroking or holding the dog.

Dr. Sandra Bonat is a consultant pediatrician at VIP StarNetwork, a provider of mobile and on-site health services. She completed her residency program in general pediatrics and a fellowship in pediatric endocrinology.

Bonat told Healthline that if the child has never been around a dog before, it’s important to give them some exposure to a dog before bringing a dog into the family.

This can be done either through interaction with a friend or family member’s dog, or in some other type of controlled setting.

Akua Boetang, Ph.D., a licensed psychotherapist and member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, tells Healthline that parents can help children get the most out of having a dog with the following strategies:

  • Allow children to identify how the animal can be part of their emotional well-being.
  • Educate the child on how caring for the animal could serve as a potential stress reliever.
  • Make sure the dog responsibility does not add more stress to the child.

Temperament

“Look for a calm, confident, affectionate and friendly dog,” Bonat said.

Dorn agrees, noting that high-maintenance dogs or dogs with a history of aggression have the potential to increase anxiety within a family and household.

Family involvement

“It can be helpful to research and investigate before involving your child in the process,” Dorn said.

“Talk with your child about this possible new addition to your family and allow them to meet potential dogs to find one they feel a connection to,” she added.

Timing of introduction

Consider the timing of the dog’s arrival in the house, Bonat said.

“Make sure there is enough time to pay attention to the new dog and to make sure family members are home and can establish a routine with the dog,” she advised.

Family commitment

Socialization, training, and exercise are all important for a dog’s well-being.

This time commitment should be considered before bringing a dog into the family, Bonat said.

Financial capacity

Dogs can be wonderful pain relievers, but they need grooming and can be an incredibly large financial commitment, Dorn notes.

Consider which vet your dog will go to and the cost of food, vet visits and any unexpected medical bills.

“If you think you can handle those commitments, great. If your family decides a dog might be too big of a commitment, a smaller pet might be a consideration,” she said.

“While dogs are wonderful companions, your child will still experience many of the same stress-relieving benefits of any well-functioning pet for your family,” Dorn added.

Adult supervision

Parental involvement and supervision (especially in children under 10) is necessary for dog ownership to be positive for the family, says Bonat.

“Younger children and those with special needs may not have the maturity to control their aggressive or angry impulses and should be supervised with the dog at all times,” she explains.

Model behavior

Keep in mind that you are setting the tone for the housework.

Bonat says parents should teach the child the proper way to care for the dog and treat the dog with kindness and patience.

If your family already has a dog (or more) and your child or children are still experiencing high levels of stress, you may be wondering what you can do next.

Bonat suggests to parents that the child take a more active role in caring for the dog.

“They can also ask the child to do activities with the dog, such as walking the dog, playing with the dog in the yard, or training the dog to do new commands or tricks,” she says.

But ultimately, if your child is still experiencing high levels of stress despite spending time with a dog or dogs, other forms of stress reduction should be considered and implemented, says Bonat. .

“This can include exercise, meditation, mindfulness, play therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT),” she said.


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Farm learning experience begins with grazing choices https://passpet.org/farm-learning-experience-begins-with-grazing-choices/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:00:12 +0000 https://passpet.org/farm-learning-experience-begins-with-grazing-choices/ GUYTON – A door to valuable learning opportunities is always open at Honey Ridge Agricenter. On June 8, a group of students from the Effingham County School District selected calves to care for and work with in preparation for a series of livestock shows, including one at the county fair. of Effingham in October. “She’s […]]]>

GUYTON – A door to valuable learning opportunities is always open at Honey Ridge Agricenter.

On June 8, a group of students from the Effingham County School District selected calves to care for and work with in preparation for a series of livestock shows, including one at the county fair. of Effingham in October.

“She’s a relative newcomer to this,” Marcia Zimmerman said as she watched her daughter, Emma, ​​choose No. 121, a Hereford heifer.

The proud mum couldn’t resist when Emma let her know she wanted to raise a cow.

“She loves animals,” Zimmerman said. “When she was much younger, we had a little cow. It was called Harley and we gave it to a friend.

Emma jumped at the chance to have a cow again after recently moving from Pennsylvania to Effingham County. The aspiring vet is a 16-year-old junior from South Effingham High School.

“I really love animals and wanted to get more involved with the school,” said Emma, ​​who was accompanied by Jackie Alascagua and Yunue Chacon. “I don’t think FFA is as big in Pennsylvania as it is here.”

Alascagua and Chacon didn’t pick a calf for themselves, but they did give their close friend some advice.

“They wanted me to buy a small one,” Emma said.

“But they’re so cute,” Alascagua said with a smile.

Emma started considering names for her new beast immediately after choosing it.

“I was thinking Betsy, Sweet Pea or Bertha,” she first said.

A few minutes later, however, Nemo came up as a possible nickname.

Emma walked around a paddock full of more than a dozen 5-6 month old cows before finalizing her choice.

“I was making sure it was a heifer and not a steer, and it was a thoroughbred,” she said. “I wanted it to look good, fundamentally, and wholesome.”

The bulk of Honey Ridge’s calves come from a prestigious Hereford line established by cattle rancher Sam Zemurray decades ago. Zemurray, a former president of the Georgia Hereford Association who died in 2018, transferred Honey Ridge and his cattle to the Effingham County School District in 2016.

“In the past, our purebred Hereford heifers have done better at local and statewide shows, including the state cattle show in Perry,” said Alicia Richardson, professor of agriculture at South Effingham High School.

Emma and other students wasted no time getting to know their cows. They were transported to a nearby barn shortly after the selection process was completed to begin halter training.

“(The cows) are very stubborn at first,” said Benjamin Richardson, an agriculture professor at South Effingham and husband of Alicia Richardson. “You’re trying to do something they’re not used to doing. It’s an amazing transformation because they are stubborn and will pull you in June, but in February they will be like puppies.

In addition to walking their animals, students wash them and give special care to their coats and hooves.

“I used to say it’s like a girl getting ready for prom,” Benjamin Richardson said.

Young Farmer Advisor Logan Hunter thinks livestock shows are growing in popularity.

“We had five (students) here picking cows today,” he said. “We had nine kids who got a goat to show off probably three weeks ago. (The goats) weaned much earlier.

A student had previously opted for a sheep.

“And we also have six pig showers here,” Hunter said.

Emma will feed and water her heifer twice a day. She will also put a halter on it regularly and walk it around in preparation for leading it into a show ring.

“I’m excited about it,” she said. “I think I’m ready.”

Without Honey Ridge Agricenter, Emma’s foray into livestock shows would not have been possible. His family lives in a housing estate in Rincon.

“(Teachers) suggest that you leave (the cow) here because she will receive the best care,” Zimmerman said. “You don’t have to buy the food or anything. They provide all of that.

Emma keeps a few animals at home – a cat, a lizard and a pair of turtles.

“Actually, she wants a horse and she has a dog,” her mother said.

Emma’s situation with her cow is shared by several Effingham County students.

“Last year we had nine pig showers and I think all nine lived in housing estates where they couldn’t have a pig,” Hunter said.

Hunter thinks livestock shows are a worthwhile endeavor for students.

“It teaches a sense of responsibility, the idea of ​​taking care of something and a knowledge for animals,” he said. “There are a lot of things in there that go towards teamwork as well. They are a team with themselves and the animal, and this place allows us – if you show up in that barn in Honey Ridge and use a county trailer – we want you to work as a team.

“These kids become friends and they basically become teammates. It’s not a team sport, but they still get a lot out of those same aspects.

Hunter offered another important thought.

“I always like to say to some of these kids, ‘It’s win or learn’ with this sport. I don’t think they ever lose in this sport or any sport,” he said. “I don’t think you ever lose at showing animals because there’s always something to learn.

“Sometimes there are things you can’t control, but you have to persevere and keep going.”

At the end of each livestock show season, which consists of approximately 10 events, students have the option of purchasing the animal of their choice or returning it to Honey Ridge. The cows will then weigh approximately 1,200 pounds.

“The females will come back to the herd,” Hunter said. “The males – we allow students to buy them if they want to. If they give them back to us, we will resell them.

“We give children the opportunity to show these animals. We’re going to feed these animals anyway, so the trade-off is that the kids learn about farming. I would do that anytime.


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