Nebraska Humane Society Tips for Pets and Cold Weather Safety

Nebraska Humane Society Provides Tips for Pets and Cold Weather Safety

Here’s how to keep your pets safe and warm during the winter

With cold temperatures and sub-zero wind chills in the forecast for the winter, the Nebraska Humane Society has given some tips for keeping your pets safe in cold weather. The Nebraska Humane Society advises bringing older pets indoors when temperatures drop below 40 degrees, and bringing all pets indoors when temperatures drop below 20 degrees. When your pets go out for a walk or to play, watch how long they stay outside. A few more tips from the Nebraska Humane Society: Ears and toes are susceptible to frostbite, so pay special attention to these areas. When walking, ice can build up between the toes, so if you see your pet preferring one foot, stop and mop the bottom, or hold the foot in your warm mitten to melt the ice. Or bring a towel on walks to clean up itchy and sore paws. After each walk, wash and dry your pet’s feet and stomach to remove ice, salt, and chemicals – and check for cracks in the pads or redness between the toes. forget about the water. Your pet needs cool (unfrozen) water to process food and burn calories to stay warm. Never shave your dog to the skin in winter, as a longer coat will give him more warmth. If your dog is long haired, simply trim to minimize ice scoops, salt crystals, and ice-melting chemicals that can dry out the skin, and don’t neglect the hair between the toes. If your dog is short-haired, consider getting a high-neck or turtleneck coat or sweater that covers from the base of the tail to the belly. For many dogs, this is regular winter clothing. Older pets and younger babies, dogs with low body fat, and those with only one diaper are all more susceptible to cold problems. If your pet must be outdoors, the Nebraska Humane Society recommends: Dog kennels: Solid wood structures with a flap – facing the wind – over the opening. Plastic kennels do not keep the cold air out. Use straw or hay for warmth, not blankets as they get wet and freeze. Water bowls: can freeze in cold weather. If your pet must be outside in cold weather, use a bowl of heated water. Keeping animals dry and sheltered from the wind is essential to conserve body heat. as low as 25 below zero. Check out the latest KETV weather forecast here.

With cold temperatures and subzero wind chills in the forecast for the winter, the Nebraska Humane Society has given some advice for keep your pets safe in cold weather.

The Nebraska Humane Society advises bringing older pets indoors when temperatures drop below 40 degrees, and bringing all pets indoors when temperatures drop below 20 degrees.

When your pets go out for a walk or to play, watch how long they stay outside. Some other tips from the Nebraska Humane Society:

  • The ears and toes are susceptible to frostbite, so pay special attention to these areas.
  • When walking, ice can build up between the toes, so if you see your pet preferring one foot, stop and mop the bottom, or hold the foot in your warm mitten to melt the ice. Or bring a towel on walks to clean up the itchy and itchy paws.
  • After each walk, wash and dry your pet’s feet and stomach to remove ice, salt, and chemicals – and check for cracks in the paw pads or redness between the toes.
  • Don’t forget the water. Your pet needs cool (unfrozen) water to process food and burn calories to stay warm.
  • Never shave your dog to the skin in winter, as a longer coat will give him more warmth. If your dog is long haired, simply trim to minimize ice scoops, salt crystals, and ice-melting chemicals that can dry out the skin, and don’t neglect the hair between the toes.
  • If your dog is short-haired, consider getting a coat or sweater with a high collar or turtleneck covering from the base of the tail to the belly. For many dogs, this is regular winter clothing.
  • Older pets and younger babies, dogs with low body fat, and those with only one diaper are all more susceptible to cold problems.

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If your pet must be outdoors, the Nebraska Humane Society recommends:

  • Doghouses: Solid wood structures with flap – facing the wind – on the opening. Plastic kennels do not keep the cold air out. Use straw or hay for warmth, not blankets as they get wet and freeze.
  • Water bowls: May freeze in cold weather. If your pet must be outside in cold weather, use a bowl of heated water.
  • Keeping animals dry and out of the wind is crucial for retaining body heat.

A wind chill advisory will be in effect Wednesday evening and Thursday morning, as the wind chill could drop to 25 below zero.

Check out the latest KETV weather forecast here.



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