necessarily reflect – Pass Pet http://passpet.org/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 16:29:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://passpet.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg necessarily reflect – Pass Pet http://passpet.org/ 32 32 Petco is keeping a streak of double-digit membership growth alive https://passpet.org/petco-is-keeping-a-streak-of-double-digit-membership-growth-alive/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/petco-is-keeping-a-streak-of-double-digit-membership-growth-alive/ petco (NASDAQ: WOOF) announced its fourth quarter and fiscal 2021 results on March 8. The results showed the pet retailer’s double-digit same-store sales growth streak extended to seven quarters. Petco’s sales exploded at the start of the pandemic and have not faltered. Millions of people were spending more time at home, away from friends, classmates […]]]>

petco (NASDAQ: WOOF) announced its fourth quarter and fiscal 2021 results on March 8. The results showed the pet retailer’s double-digit same-store sales growth streak extended to seven quarters.

Petco’s sales exploded at the start of the pandemic and have not faltered. Millions of people were spending more time at home, away from friends, classmates and colleagues. The trend has fueled a rise in demand for the companionship of a furry friend.

Let’s take a closer look at Petco’s fourth quarter results and what they could mean for investors.

Petco’s sales skyrocketed at the start of the pandemic as people craved companionship. Image source: Getty Images.

Petco maintains an impressive growth streak

Note that same-store sales growth includes stores open for at least 12 months and excludes the impacts of new store openings and closings. That said, in its fourth quarter ended Jan. 29, Petco reported component sales growth of 14%. This is the seventh consecutive quarter of double-digit growth for the indicator.

The streak began in the second quarter of 2020, just as the pandemic was worsening in the United States. In Q1 2020, the quarter before the outbreak, Petco saw compounding growth of just 2%. The upward shift highlights the magnitude of the positive effect the pandemic is having on Petco’s business.

CEO Ron Coughlin commented on the company’s success in the earnings press release:

Our category remains strong and resilient; our competitive trenches are deepening and our world-class team is executing to deliver goal-driven performance. With an integrated omnichannel infrastructure, a robust service offering including 197 veterinary hospitals and millions of net new customers, we are well positioned to generate increased long-term shareholder value.

Early in the pandemic, pet adoptions and supplies to foster new pets were the categories that initially jumped. Now that the world is entering the third year of the pandemic and economies are cautiously reopening, pet adoptions are slowing. Fortunately for Petco and its shareholders, pets are usually a long-term commitment. Pets adopted at the start of the pandemic will get fatter and need to eat more. Plus, they’ll roll out of beds and need new toys to tear up.

Petco sees this trend evolving in its business. Sales of supplies and pets rose 4.1% year over year in the quarter ended Jan. 29. Meanwhile, consumables like dog and cat food jumped 18.8%.

What this could mean for investors

Petco’s impressive results were not enough to counter the trend of general stock market jitters following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Petco’s stock fell about 1% after its announcement on March 8.

Overall, Petco trades at a price-to-sales and price-to-free cash flow ratio of 0.9 and 40.5, respectively, well below its online-only competitor. Softas shown in the graph.

A chart showing valuation metrics for Petco and Chewy.

Valuation metrics for Petco and Chewy. Data by Ycharts.

Admittedly, Chewy is growing faster than Petco, pre-pandemic and post-pandemic, but investors may prefer Petco at nearly half the valuation.

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Parkev Tatevosian owns Chewy, Inc. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Chewy, Inc. The Motley Fool has a Disclosure Policy.

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Can biotech stocks provide crypto-like growth for your portfolio? https://passpet.org/can-biotech-stocks-provide-crypto-like-growth-for-your-portfolio/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 11:15:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/can-biotech-stocks-provide-crypto-like-growth-for-your-portfolio/ As illustrated by shiba inusThe explosive start of 2021, cryptocurrencies are an area where investors can find huge growth. Another such field is biotechnology, where soaring stock prices are (usually) driven by clinical trial results and regulatory decisions rather than memes and out-of-control hype. It goes without saying that biotech stocks and cryptocurrencies are bad […]]]>

As illustrated by shiba inusThe explosive start of 2021, cryptocurrencies are an area where investors can find huge growth. Another such field is biotechnology, where soaring stock prices are (usually) driven by clinical trial results and regulatory decisions rather than memes and out-of-control hype.

It goes without saying that biotech stocks and cryptocurrencies are bad places for risk-averse investors. But is it possible for risk-tolerant investors to capture crypto-like benefits without facing catastrophic meltdowns by investing in biotech? It’s not a common occurrence, but it might be more likely than you think.

Image source: Getty Images.

It is possible for biotechs to reach the moon

Buying early-stage biotech stocks is a lot like buying lesser-known cryptocurrencies.

Pre-product biotechnology companies have no revenue, although they have projects that could generate significant revenue in the future, provided these projects can survive the demands of the clinical trial process. Since only 13.8% of attempts to manufacture a new drug fail in clinical trials, these early-stage companies are particularly risky.

Some companies may have a large sum of money to ground the stock price in reality, but many operate as phantom stocks.

The company’s plans for the future are what determine its share price. As investors get more information about what the company’s earnings might look like, such as if, for example, a key project gets positive validation in a clinical trial, the stock rises. Earnings and other measures of financial performance are generally not a major consideration, as it is expected that the non-existent revenues of the present will eventually give way to significant growth.

Take the vaccine developers Modern (NASDAQ: ARNM) and BioNTech (NASDAQ: BNTX) for example. From November 2019 to November 2020, even before their coronavirus vaccines hit the broader market, shares of Moderna rose around 330% and BioNTech saw a gain of around 416%. For reference, the two major cryptocurrencies Bitcoin (CRYPTO: BTC) and Ethereum (CRYPTO:ETH) rose around 45% and 109% over the same period, fueled by a combination of speculative buying and more widespread adoption.

ARNM Chart

mRNA data by YCharts

So, these two biotechs are definitely in the range of cryptocurrency-like returns – but they also took advantage of a huge opportunity that they will no longer have.

Although its shares rose in the months leading up to Food and Drug Administration approval and surged once approval was granted, Moderna real the ascent didn’t begin until later in the year when revenues began to flow. According to its latest earnings report, it made $18.5 billion in total revenue in 2021.

It’s hard to see how either stock would have reached its current highs without the intense global demand for a coronavirus vaccine. While it’s possible that their other earlier-stage pipeline programs eventually generated returns, it’s unlikely that any of these programs would have an addressable market as large as virtually everyone on earth, as has been the case with their COVID jabs.

The stars don’t align very often

BioNTech and Moderna are exceptional cases. Without the combination of a global crisis and the powerful catalysts to find a solution to that crisis and then commercialize it successfully, the average biotech stock struggles to provide cryptocurrency-like returns.

Think of high-profile gene-editing companies as CRISPR therapeutics and Therapeutic Intellia. Neither has anything to do with pandemic-related drug development. Even after much publicity and encouraging results from mid-stage clinical trials, CRISPR’s stock has only risen about 80.4% in the past three years, and its recent performance has been lackluster. In contrast, Intellia shares rose more than 545% over the same period due to a similar mix of positive developments.

It’s not as much as Bitcoin, but it’s in the same ballpark. But are biotech stocks as risky as Bitcoin? Could it be that biotechnology is able to generate returns similar to those of cryptocurrencies without falling victim to the same magnitude of downward fluctuations?

Unfortunately, that doesn’t seem to be the case. So far this year, Bitcoin has lost less value than any of the biotechs I’ve talked about today. And Moderna and BioNTech have also lost more value than Ethereum, even though they are making billions and billions of dollars from the sale of their vaccines.

^ SPX Chart

^ SPX data by YCharts

If you are looking to balance the growth potential of your portfolio by introducing highly speculative investments, know that cryptocurrency is indeed a performance alternative to biotechs. But don’t go overboard with your allowance.

While in principle early-stage biotechs shouldn’t be so prone to extreme cryptocurrency-like volatility due to their (limited, but still existing) financial fundamentals, they often are. Just make sure you have plenty of pillars in your wallet so you have something valuable at the end of the day.

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Alex Carchidi owns Ethereum and Shiba Inu. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Bitcoin, CRISPR Therapeutics and Ethereum. The Motley Fool recommends Moderna Inc. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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Why Freshpet’s stock was skyrocketing today https://passpet.org/why-freshpets-stock-was-skyrocketing-today/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 19:38:37 +0000 https://passpet.org/why-freshpets-stock-was-skyrocketing-today/ What happened Shares of Freshpet (NASDAQ:FRPT) rose today after the fresh pet food maker released strong results in its fourth-quarter earnings report and offered a better-than-expected guidance for 2022 despite supply chain challenges. As of 1:16 p.m. ET, the stock was up 14.8%. Image source: Getty Images. So what Freshpet said revenue for the quarter […]]]>

What happened

Shares of Freshpet (NASDAQ:FRPT) rose today after the fresh pet food maker released strong results in its fourth-quarter earnings report and offered a better-than-expected guidance for 2022 despite supply chain challenges.

As of 1:16 p.m. ET, the stock was up 14.8%.

Image source: Getty Images.

So what

Freshpet said revenue for the quarter rose 37.1% to $115.9 million, in line with estimates. Management credited “speed, distribution gains and innovation” for the strong growth, which means it’s attracting new retail partners and accelerating shipments.

Adjusted gross margin fell from 45.8% to 41.7% due to higher salaries, cost inflation and investments in increased capacity.

Selling, general and administrative expenses also increased by 46% due to higher transportation costs and advertising expenses. As a result, its adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) went from $12.9 million to $9.7 million. Ultimately, it reported a generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) loss per share of $0.21, down from a loss per share of $0.08 in the year-ago quarter, and worse than consensus with a loss per share of $0.16. .

Touting the company’s recent investments, CEO Billy Cyr said:

We finally have the capacity to support Freshpet’s significant revenue growth potential, while improving the reliability of our operations. Over the past two years, we’ve invested in significant new capabilities and the talent needed to support them. We plan to use this capacity wisely, budgeting prudently to ensure the reliability of our operations in an uncertain environment, but also planning aggressively to maximize our growth potential.

Now what

What seemed to trigger the stock’s gains today was advice from Freshpet. The company actually expects revenue growth to accelerate from 33.5% to at least 35% growth this year, and claims at least $575 million in revenue. That was ahead of Wall Street estimates at $562.4 million. It also sees adjusted EBITDA above $55 million, implying a 28% or better increase from 2022.

Freshpet has been a reliable growth stock in the recession-proof pet products industry because its fresh and refrigerated food sales model sets it apart from its competitors. With the stock down 40% from its peak nearly a year ago, the upside potential is much clearer here.

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Jeremy Bowman has no position in the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Freshpet. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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The S&P 500 Index Just Entered Correction Territory: Warren Buffett’s Top 3 Stocks to Buy Right Now https://passpet.org/the-sp-500-index-just-entered-correction-territory-warren-buffetts-top-3-stocks-to-buy-right-now/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 12:26:24 +0000 https://passpet.org/the-sp-500-index-just-entered-correction-territory-warren-buffetts-top-3-stocks-to-buy-right-now/ FAfter the announcement of the invasion of Ukraine by Russia, the S&P500 the index fell more than 10% from its peak, marking an official entry into correction territory. The benchmark level has recently regained some ground, but is still down around 9% from last year’s peak and 8% on all 2022 trading. As turmoil rocks […]]]>

FAfter the announcement of the invasion of Ukraine by Russia, the S&P500 the index fell more than 10% from its peak, marking an official entry into correction territory. The benchmark level has recently regained some ground, but is still down around 9% from last year’s peak and 8% on all 2022 trading.

As turmoil rocks the market, three Motley Fool contributors have identified three stocks backed by legendary investor Warren Buffett and his company Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE: BRK.A) (NYSE: BRK.B) that are worth buying right now. Read on to see why they think that Amazon (NASDAQ: AMZN), Bank of America (NYSE: BAC)and UPS (NYSE: UPS) are the best companies to invest in amid recent market turbulence.

Image source: The Motley Fool.

This tech giant is built to win the future

Keith Noonan (Amazon): E-commerce and cloud computing leader Amazon is a relatively small stake in Berkshire Hathaway’s portfolio. The investment conglomerate only started building a position in the business in 2019, and Buffett went so far as to describe himself as an “idiot” for not getting in on the action sooner. Even the man who earned the moniker Oracle of Omaha has investment regrets, and it’s not hard to see why he was disappointed to miss out on much of the Amazon’s incredible rise. .

Amazon is one of the most successful companies of all time, and there’s a good chance it’ll go on to land more big wins. With the stock having retreated amid recent turmoil in the broader market, long-term investors have another attractive opportunity to build positions in this world-shaping company.

The stock is trading down about 9% in 2021 trading, and it’s down about 19% from the high it hit last year. With incredible, pandemic-focused performance, Amazon admittedly faces some tough growth comparisons. Heavy investments in technology and infrastructure are also putting some pressure on near-term earnings, but the company remains perfectly positioned to win the future, and it will almost certainly be one of the most influential companies in the next decade.

In addition to its industry-leading online retail and cloud services business, Amazon has also benefited from its fast-growing digital advertising unit. With its expertise in data analytics and its incredibly valuable e-commerce marketplace, the company has the foundation to create an even more phenomenal advertising business, and this kind of cross-segment synergy will likely continue to be an advantage in a wide variety of other emerging markets. categories of products and services.

Unexpected earnings growth ahead

James Brumley (Bank of America): I’ve long been a fan of Berkshire’s second-largest publicly traded holding company, Bank of America. But I’m even more of a fan now than usual.

Yes, the stock’s recent pullback related to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine will likely only be a short-term setback. That’s not my motivation to mention it now, though…nor is it the reason Berkshire owns a $44 billion stake in the megabank. I suspect Buffett and his cronies like the same thing I do here, which is the stock dividend.

Investors watching the stock closely will likely know that its current dividend yield is just under 2% after last week’s drop, which is healthy but hardly impressive. Take a step back and look at the big picture. The Federal Reserve projects that about eight quarter-point interest rate hikes will be imposed by the end of 2024. This is important for banks because the higher interest rates rise, the more loans become profitable. Clearly, there is a possibility that the Fed could go too far, too fast, stifling loan demand and even stifling the economy. Assuming Fed Governors pace their rate hikes responsibly, however, I can see B of A’s net interest income rising more than most people currently expect.

At the very least, stepping in now means you’re stepping into a low-cost, high-quality blue chip name at a time when quality and value are likely to be rewarded.

UPS is at the top of its game

Daniel Foelber (UPS): With Berkshire Hathaway holding just under 60,000 shares, United Parcel Service represents less than 0.1% of its portfolio. But UPS has the makings of a stock of Buffett textbooks. It cares about strong fundamentals – so let’s highlight some of the main reasons why UPS is a good buy now.

UPS expects to generate an operating margin of 13.7% in 2022 on revenue of $102 billion. The forecast represents lower revenue growth but even higher profitability. UPS generated a return on invested capital (ROIC) of 30.8% in 2021. It expects the ROIC to be over 30% in 2022.

Like operating margin, ROIC is a good indicator for determining the efficiency of a business. While operating margin shows how well a company is able to convert sales into profit, ROIC shows how well a company is able to deploy capital to profitable ventures. Before Carol Tomé took over as CEO in March 2020, UPS was a big business with overgrown routes, slow growth, poor operating margin and low ROIC. Since then, UPS has streamlined its capital expenditure (capex) to focus on profitable businesses. Despite record revenues, profits and free cash flow in 2021, UPS has only spent $4.2 billion in capital expenditures and plans $5.5 billion in capital expenditures in 2022, which is lower than expected. he spent in 2019.

All this to say that UPS uses its profits to deliberately grow its business. It also passes profits on to shareholders through its dividend and stock buybacks. UPS has just increased its dividend by 49% to $6.08 per share per year, which represents an annual return of 2.9%. It plans to buy back at least $1 billion of its own shares in 2022 and distribute $5.2 billion to shareholders in the form of dividends.

Additionally, UPS has a price-to-earnings ratio of just 13.9, which makes it absurdly cheap given its strong fundamentals.

Great management, a high dividend yield, a massive moat that shields competition, good value, and a growing business are all traits Buffett is looking for. And UPS has them all in spades.

10 stocks we like better than Amazon
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John Mackey, CEO of Whole Foods Market, an Amazon subsidiary, is a board member of The Motley Fool. Bank of America is an advertising partner of The Ascent, a Motley Fool company. Daniel Foelber has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. James Brumley has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Keith Noonan has no position in the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Amazon and Berkshire Hathaway (B shares). The Motley Fool recommends the following options: $200 long calls in January 2023 on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares), $200 short puts in January 2023 on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares) and short calls of $265 in January 2023 on Berkshire Hathaway (B shares). The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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“Scary realistic:” What Unity’s latest acquisition means for its future https://passpet.org/scary-realistic-what-unitys-latest-acquisition-means-for-its-future/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/scary-realistic-what-unitys-latest-acquisition-means-for-its-future/ Unity (NYSE:U) recently made some interesting acquisitions, but one is definitely worth exploring further. In this music video from “The Gaming Show” on Motley Fool live, recorded on February 7Fool contributors Jon Quast and Jose Najarro discuss the video game tech company’s purchase of Ziva Dynamics. 10 stocks we like better than Unity Software Inc.When […]]]>

Unity (NYSE:U) recently made some interesting acquisitions, but one is definitely worth exploring further. In this music video from “The Gaming Show” on Motley Fool live, recorded on February 7Fool contributors Jon Quast and Jose Najarro discuss the video game tech company’s purchase of Ziva Dynamics.

10 stocks we like better than Unity Software Inc.
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Jon Quast: I want to ask you about another acquisition. You mentioned Weta, but I know you also wrote, I believe on Ziva Dynamics and I was checking out some of the things Ziva can do. I was blown away by the realism of things with Ziva.

Jose Najarro: I don’t know why it was barely mentioned. I think Ziva is maybe just a bit smaller than Weta. Ziva, they work great for creating real digital avatars. Their goal is to make sure that the skin, the tissues, the way the muscles move in some of these avatars look realistic. On their earnings call, they actually brought up I forgot her name, it was – If you go to their YouTube platform, they show her. It’s a digital avatar that runs behind the Unity platform. It looks really realistic.

Quest: Scary realistic.

Najarro: Yes. That’s why I think there’s a lot of talk about the potentials of these avatars. Maybe not overtake, but we might start to see them enter the consumer market. Hey, maybe if you go to a drive-thru, one of those digital avatars could take your order.

If you are checking into a hotel there may be your typical where you go to speak in person or you can go to the other line where it is more like a quick digital avatar that can help you. But another thing that they mentioned with Ziva Dynamics, I believe they’re called, the acquisition is that Ziva has been very good at bringing in tools from visual studios and kind of tying it into gaming technology.

For example, Unity is gaming technology at heart. When they bought Weta, it was more about visual studio technology. The reason they also bought Ziva was to buy this bridge. I think it was a very good decision. They’re going to use this technology that Ziva already has to make this integration with Weta and Unity a lot easier where they don’t have to spend all this money on research and development and focus on building this bridge. I think Unity’s management is very successful with its acquisitions. For now, I am satisfied with all the acquisitions they have made.

Jon Quast owns Unity Software Inc. Jose Najarro owns Unity Software Inc. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Unity Software Inc. The Motley Fool has a Disclosure Policy.

The views and opinions expressed herein are the views and opinions of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Nasdaq, Inc.


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Why did Harvard faculty close ranks to defend an alleged abuser? | sexual assault https://passpet.org/why-did-harvard-faculty-close-ranks-to-defend-an-alleged-abuser-sexual-assault/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 15:07:53 +0000 https://passpet.org/why-did-harvard-faculty-close-ranks-to-defend-an-alleged-abuser-sexual-assault/ Over the past two weeks, allegations of sexual harassment in Harvard University’s anthropology department have captured the public’s attention. A lawsuit filed last Tuesday claims Harvard knew Professor John Comaroff had a long history of student harassment, but repeatedly failed to take action. The allegations are deeply disturbing, but unfortunately they’re not all that different […]]]>

Over the past two weeks, allegations of sexual harassment in Harvard University’s anthropology department have captured the public’s attention. A lawsuit filed last Tuesday claims Harvard knew Professor John Comaroff had a long history of student harassment, but repeatedly failed to take action. The allegations are deeply disturbing, but unfortunately they’re not all that different from other campus stories across the country. As the past decade of student organization in the United States has made clear, American schools – from elementary schools to graduate programs – too often turn a blind eye when students report harassment.

So why did the Harvard story blow up? Probably because of the unusually blatant manner in which the faculty has rushed to protect its own. Days before the lawsuit was filed, a group of 38 Harvard professors, including famous scholars like Jill Lepore, published an open letter defending Comaroff. Harvard had recently placed Comaroff on a semester of unpaid leave, and the undersigned faculty were “appalled by Harvard’s sanctions against him.” They defended the conduct for which they believed he had been sanctioned: advising a student that she would likely be raped if she traveled to South Africa. They wondered why Harvard had launched two separate investigations into Comaroff, rather than just one. And then they said they “know John Comaroff as an excellent colleague, adviser and committed academic citizen” – as if that meant he couldn’t be a stalker.

After the trial, and after Harvard provided a straightforward answer to their procedural question, nearly all of the signatories literally withdrew their support – although only a few apologized for signing. They were right to do so. Thirty-four admitted, in a second letter, that they “lack complete information about the case”. And, more importantly, the professors hadn’t foreseen the obvious signal that their letter would send to their students: that if a young person dared to come forward against a prominent scholar, the faculty would close ranks, damn the facts.

Because campus sexual abuse investigations typically take place behind closed doors, the public rarely gets to see how universities protect their “stars” — such as top academics or champion quarterbacks — from abuse. allegations of sexual harassment. The Harvard letter thus served as an unusually visible and unusually brazen demonstration of a dynamic that many survivors faced in private.

The letter also served as a frustrating example of the confusion in the US debate over due process for alleged harassers. Over the past decade, the United States has gone through a very public and painful record of both the prevalence of sexual harassment and the willingness of institutions – from schools to Hollywood to fast food restaurants – to punish sexual harassment. victims who come forward. In response, many critics have raised concerns about whether those accused of sexual harassment are being treated fairly now that these institutions are feeling some pressure to do good by survivors.

Some alleged harassers, they say, have been denied their right to due process – to tell their side of the story, to be heard by an impartial decision-maker, to be judged on the facts and not on outside demands.

As I explain in my recent book Sexual Justice, these debates are a hodgepodge of good faith criticism and bad faith misappropriation. On the one hand, there are important questions to ask about how institutions can investigate misconduct – including, but not limited to, sexual harm – within them. In my research, I spoke to people who had been the subject of truly unfair investigations that served no one, accused or victim.

But sometimes people call for ‘due process’ when they really mean ‘impunity’. Last summer, for example, many argued that then-New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was being pressured to resign over allegations of sexual harassment without “due process”. But the pressure has reached a boiling point only because of the damning conclusions reached through a long independent investigation. For many years, a Georgia state legislator has raised a battle cry over alleged injustice toward men accused of sexual assault and racism on college campuses. All the while, behind the scenes, he tried to bully schools into getting particular results in particular surveys, as if that was fairer. In other words, as law professor Nancy Chi Cantalupo put it, “due process” has become, for some, a “dog whistle.”

This mix of meritorious and bogus criticism makes it difficult to discern which concerns are worth addressing and which are anti-feminist hysteria designed to derail progress. And that’s a shame, because you really have to make the distinction. If we dismiss procedural concerns out of hand, we will ignore real injustices. But if we treat every men’s rights activist’s hyperbole as a credible warning, we will be conscripted into their misogynistic scheme.

I will not claim to have devised a perfect test to differentiate valid criticism from apology. And I can’t say whether Harvard treated Comaroff unfairly, because I only know what has been reported publicly. But I will say that, from the outside, the procedural criticism of the open letter seemed more akin to a “dog whistle” than a legitimate concern.

For starters, Harvard provided a direct response to the professors’ objection to the dual investigation of Comaroff: Harvard, like many other schools, separates investigations into sexual harassment and other types of misconduct. (I think this bifurcation is bad for victims, for reasons I explain in my book, but that’s another matter.) That would have been clear to any faculty member who had read the public policies of the schools. I then wonder if the professors had any reason to believe that the Harvard investigation was procedurally unsound beyond the fact that they did not like the outcome – and therefore if the question they raised had a purpose other than to slander the allegations.

And it’s especially hard to credit these professors as champions of due process when they rushed for their own unfair judgment. They criticized the school for achieving a particular outcome in a particular case without, by their own admission, knowing the facts. They prejudged the allegations based on their personal affinity with the accused, that is, their bias. The letter can be read, perhaps without generosity, to pressure Harvard to modify the result of its investigation according to the weight of the titles of the signatories. So forgive me if I take his procedural criticism with a grain of salt.

Professors would have been better served had they heeded a fundamental principle of due process: that judgments should be rendered impartially. They might have realized that their affection for Comaroff made them particularly ill-placed to assess the allegations against him. They could have raised genuine concerns about Harvard policies through a separate channel, not tied to any particular case. They might have realized they should sit this one out.

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the editorial position of Al Jazeera.


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The smartest dividend stocks to buy with $400 right now https://passpet.org/the-smartest-dividend-stocks-to-buy-with-400-right-now/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/the-smartest-dividend-stocks-to-buy-with-400-right-now/ Dividend stocks can be a “cheat code” for building wealth. Your dividend stocks work around the clock, earning the profits paid to you just for being a shareholder. Suppose you invest money and time to collect dividend-paying stocks and reinvest your earnings to keep buying more. In this case, you can trigger a snowball of […]]]>

Dividend stocks can be a “cheat code” for building wealth. Your dividend stocks work around the clock, earning the profits paid to you just for being a shareholder.

Suppose you invest money and time to collect dividend-paying stocks and reinvest your earnings to keep buying more. In this case, you can trigger a snowball of passive income that could eventually cover your living expenses. Every snowball starts out as a snowflake, and getting into dividend stocks doesn’t have to be expensive. Here are four great dividend-paying stocks you can buy for a total of under $400.

1. A high yield oil titan

ExxonMobil (NYSE: XOM) is one of the largest energy companies in the world. It is an integrated oil major, involved in both the exploration and production of oil and natural gas, their refining and their distribution. The company is a dividend aristocrat that has been able to pay and grow its dividend every year for the past 38 years and today offers a dividend yield of 4.5%.

Image source: Getty Images.

Its massive size and balance sheet have helped it weather weak oil prices for much of the past decade. Now that oil prices have rebounded, Exxon is coming back stronger than ever. It generated $48 billion in cash flow from operations in the fourth quarter of 2021, its highest since 2012. Some green technologies like electric vehicles have become hot investment topics, but the role of ExxonMobil in meeting global energy needs should be assured for the foreseeable future.

2. A smoldering dividend

Altria Group (NYSE: MO) is a tobacco and nicotine products company that sells Marlboro brand cigarettes in the United States, as well as nicotine pouches, chewing tobacco and cigars. The company also holds minority stakes in a liquor company Anheuser-Busch InBevcannabis company Chronos Group, and e-cigarette company Juul Labs. Altria has increased its dividend for 51 years, making it a Dividend King that offers investors a 7.2% yield.

Fewer people smoke in the United States each year; Altria shipped 126.6 billion cigarettes and cigars in 2014, but only 95.6 billion in 2021, a 24% drop. However, the company’s operating profit fell from $7.6 billion in 2014 to $10.4 billion in 2021, or 37% to augment. Altria relies on the addictive properties of its products to gradually increase its prices in order to compensate for the drop in volumes. As long as this continues, investors can probably expect that big dividend to keep coming.

3. Calling all dividend investors

Verizon Communications (NYSE:VZ) is part of the wireless oligopoly in the United States, where a small group of telecommunications stocks controls the industry. Verizon holds around 29% of the market, making it the second-largest carrier in the United States. The satellites, towers and cables on which wireless networks run cost billions of dollars to build and maintain over the years, making it unlikely that a competitor would invest the money needed to get into space. and pose a threat.

And as people become more dependent on smartphones in daily life, the phone bill has become almost like a utility, getting the same priority in a household’s budget as the electricity and water bill. Verizon’s business has proven resilient through many tough times like the pandemic, helping it grow its payouts over the past 17 years. Investors can get a 4.8% return from Verizon today.

4. Peanut butter and jelly time

the JM Smucker Company (NYSE: SJM) is a consumer and pet food company that manufactures a variety of nut butters, fruit spreads, coffee and pet foods. These small products are purchased by consumers on a weekly or monthly basis, creating steady streams of income. Consumer products can be competitive and generic brands can put pressure on the prices of name brands like what JM Smucker sells. However, the company has shown brand power over the years, managing to grow its revenue by an average of 5% each year for the past decade.

The stock is also poised to become a dividend aristocrat; its dividend growth streak is currently 24 years and it offers a yield of 2.9%. The company faced challenges in this high inflation environment, where rising raw material and shipping costs put pressure on profit margins. Yet the company only devotes half of its cash flow to dividends. Therefore, the payout seems perfectly safe through these headwinds which should prove to be temporary.

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Justin Pope has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns and recommends JM Smucker. The Motley Fool recommends Anheuser-Busch InBev NV and Verizon Communications. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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5 Unstoppable Actions That Can Turn $150,000 Into $1 Million By 2032 (Or Sooner) https://passpet.org/5-unstoppable-actions-that-can-turn-150000-into-1-million-by-2032-or-sooner/ Sun, 13 Feb 2022 10:06:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/5-unstoppable-actions-that-can-turn-150000-into-1-million-by-2032-or-sooner/ For many investors, the new year got off to a bad start. Growth stock depends on both Nasdaq Compound and broad-based S&P500 suffered its biggest correction since the pandemic-induced crash of March 2020. While big declines in benchmarks can be nerve-wracking in the short term, they historically provide a great opportunity to invest in game-changing […]]]>

For many investors, the new year got off to a bad start. Growth stock depends on both Nasdaq Compound and broad-based S&P500 suffered its biggest correction since the pandemic-induced crash of March 2020.

While big declines in benchmarks can be nerve-wracking in the short term, they historically provide a great opportunity to invest in game-changing companies at a discount. This is especially true for investors who plan to hold their holdings for many years or even a decade.

If you have dreamed of becoming a millionaire, the following five unstoppable actions can help you achieve your goal. These innovative companies have all the tools necessary to turn a $150,000 investment into $1 million by 2032, or maybe sooner.

Image source: Getty Images.

Assets received

The first stock that could return 567% (or more) over the next decade and make people millionaires with an investment of $150,000 is the cloud-based lending platform. Assets received (NASDAQ: UPST).

The traditional lending process, at least for personal loans, can be slow, arduous and costly, both for the banks and for the customer trying to take out a loan. Rather than relying on this one-size-fits-all lending approach, Upstart’s platform relies on artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to more accurately determine customer creditworthiness. About two-thirds of requests handled by Upstart led to instant approvals. This means less hassle for customers and reduced costs for Upstart’s banking partners.

At the moment, Upstart is primarily focused on personal loans. But its acquisition of Prodigy Software, which closed last year, gives it a foothold to oversee auto loan originations. The market value of granting car loans is 8.3 times that of personal loans. In other words, Upstart is only scratching the surface when it comes to how its cloud-based platform can help lenders and consumers.

Another thing to note about Upstart is that over 90% of its revenue comes from the fees it collects from banks and service centers. Since it has no direct credit exposure, a rise in interest rates and/or a contraction in the economy will not negatively affect its business.

Two businessmen using laptop and whiteboard to discuss strategy.

Image source: Getty Images.

PubMatic

Don’t forget small cap stocks when looking for companies that can multiply your initial investment by 6 times. Cloud-based programmatic advertising company PubMatic (NASDAQ: PUBM) is the perfect example of a small cap company with a huge track.

Programmatic advertising describes the process of using machine learning software to manage the buying, selling and optimization of advertisements. PubMatic is a sales provider, which simply means that it aims to sell digital display advertising space for its customers, the publishers. The company’s platform is tasked with making the distinction between generating as much revenue as possible for display space and putting relevant content in front of users. If this satisfies advertisers, it often means that PubMatic customers see their pricing power increase over time.

The beauty of PubMatic’s operating model is that we are seeing a steady shift of advertising dollars from print to digital channels. While global digital ad spend is expected to grow at 10% per year through the middle of the decade, PubMatic’s revenue has grown at many multiples of that rate for years. The company has posted four consecutive quarters of organic growth of at least 50%, driven primarily by increased demand for programmatic advertising in connected TV and over-the-top settings.

PubMatic seems like a surefire winner for patient investors.

A person using a tablet to have a virtual chat with a doctor.

Image source: Getty Images.

Teladoc Health

Another unstoppable stock with the ability to turn $150,000 into $1 million by 2032, or possibly sooner, is telemedicine kingpin. Teladoc Health (NYSE: TDOC).

The big knock against Teladoc has long been that it was “just a pandemic game”. Although it was in the right place, at the right time, when the pandemic hit, there is clear evidence that telehealth is a movement that had legs long before the arrival of the coronavirus pandemic. For example, Teladoc averaged 74% annual sales growth in the six years to 2020. That’s no coincidence. This is representative of a shift in the way personalized care is delivered.

The advantage of telehealth services is that they benefit all parties along the healthcare treatment chain. Virtual visits are more convenient for patients and can allow doctors to better monitor people with chronic conditions, which improves patient outcomes. Better prospects for patients should mean less money in the pockets of health insurers. This suggests that insurers will push for increased use of telehealth in the wake of the pandemic.

Teladoc’s telehealth platform, paired with Livongo Health’s AI-powered service to help chronic care members lead healthier lives (Teladoc acquired Livongo in Q4 2020), represents the future of personalized patient care. United States

Five clear jars on a dispensary counter filled with unique dried cannabis buds.

Image source: Getty Images.

Planet 13 farms

If you prefer low-key businesses, marijuana stock Planet 13 farms (OTC: PLNH.F) delivers the growth and differentiation needed to turn a $150,000 investment into $1 million by 2032.

Most US multistate operators have chosen to open outlets or grow farms in many legalized states. Planet 13, on the other hand, has only two active dispensaries. But these aren’t your ordinary pan stores. The Las Vegas SuperStore spans 112,000 square feet and includes a coffee shop, event center, and consumer processing center. Meanwhile, the SuperStore in Orange County, California spans 55,000 square feet, 30% of which is devoted to selling space. Planet 13’s stores are just as focused on the cannabis lover experience as they are on sales.

Besides the sheer size of these SuperStores, Planet 13 relies on technology, personalization and branding to drive results. For example, the Las Vegas SuperStore has self-paid kiosks for customers who know what they want. The store also provides personal assistants to guide shoppers through their experience. But it’s the introduction of proprietary brands that could really boost margins.

With expansion plans in Chicago, Miami and Orlando, Planet 13’s sales growth won’t be slowing down any time soon.

A veterinarian examining a small white dog.

Image source: Getty Images.

Trupanion

One last unstoppable stock that can turn $150,000 into $1 million in 10 years or less is pet health insurer Trupanion (NASDAQ: TRUP).

Next to food and utilities, there is arguably no industry or sector more recession-proof than pets. According to the American Pet Products Association, 70 percent of U.S. households now own a pet, up from 56 percent in 1988. Additionally, it’s been at least a quarter century since year-over-year spending on pets pets have declined in the United States. No matter what kind of economic disaster befalls consumers, pet owners continue to open their wallets wider to their furry family members.

What makes Trupanion so intriguing is its potential pool of customers. Only about 1% of pets in the United States are insured, and 2% in Canada. Trupanion estimates that a 25% penetration rate in these markets, equivalent to the penetration rate for pet insurance in the UK, would equate to a potential market of $34.1 billion. It’s huge, and it seems to get bigger every year.

In addition to surpassing 1.1 million registered pets in the September quarter, Trupanion brings two decades of industry relationships, as well as its proprietary software that enables payments at clinics to the time of service. It has clear advantages in the pet insurance business and looks poised for sustained double-digit growth throughout the decade.

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Sean Williams owns Teladoc Health. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Planet 13 Holdings, PubMatic, Teladoc Health, Trupanion and Upstart Holdings. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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1 Top-Dog Pet Stock for the long term https://passpet.org/1-top-dog-pet-stock-for-the-long-term/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 13:25:32 +0000 https://passpet.org/1-top-dog-pet-stock-for-the-long-term/ PThey are family, and we care about their health and happiness as such. But it’s hard for pet owners to accurately budget for their pets’ healthcare expenses when they get sick or injured. Trupanion (NASDAQ: TRUP), a leading provider of pet medical insurance, helps pet owners take the guesswork out of the cost of pet […]]]>

PThey are family, and we care about their health and happiness as such. But it’s hard for pet owners to accurately budget for their pets’ healthcare expenses when they get sick or injured. Trupanion (NASDAQ: TRUP), a leading provider of pet medical insurance, helps pet owners take the guesswork out of the cost of pet healthcare. As the company continues to grow rapidly, investors have three main reasons to take a closer look.

Pet insurance is in its infancy

When Darryl Rawlings was 14, his family could not afford to have their dog Mitzi operated on. Inspired by this experience, Rawlings founded Trupanion in 2000 with a mission to make the best possible medical care more affordable and accessible to pet owners.

Pet insurance has grown in popularity over the past two decades, yet less than 3% of the 180 million pet dogs and cats in North America are registered for insurance. The United States and Canada lag behind some European counterparts like the United Kingdom and Sweden, where 25% and 40% of pets are covered by insurance, respectively. Considering that 120 million pets in North America visit veterinarians each year, the potential market opportunity for Trupanion can be very compelling if pet insurance adoption in North America can reach even a fraction of what we see in Europe.

Image source: Getty Images.

Trupanion has built a strong moat with two decades of learning

Insurance companies succeed in part because they are able to predict payouts to their customers with reasonable accuracy. As an early entrant into the industry, Trupanion has a natural edge over its competition with its two decades of data on pets of different breeds, pet care spending, and pet owners. The insights gained from this data help Trupanion more accurately assess the risk of each policy and price its policies to avoid losing money.

The company, with its growing understanding of pet care, is also delivering more and more value to customers. Trupanion believes it offers the broadest coverage in the industry with comprehensive lifetime pet coverage, encompassing hereditary and congenital conditions with no payout limits. More and more customers choose Trupanion, stick to their insurance plans and pay more.

Customer Metrics 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021*
Total registered pets (thousands) 344 423 521 647 863 1,104
Average Monthly Retention 98.60% 98.63% 98.60% 98.58% 98.71%
Avg. monthly income per animal $47.82 $52.07 $54.34 $57.52 $60.37

SOURCE: Company earnings release. (* 2021 figures are from January to September 2021)

The company has developed strong relationships with veterinarians, whose credibility makes customers more likely to sign up when veterinarians recommend Trupanion’s services. Trupanion has dedicated sales staff working with veterinarians and offers these veterinarians a patented veterinarian software platform that streamlines the financial aspects of pet healthcare for veterinarians and owners. The software can send insurance payments directly to veterinary offices as soon as clients leave, eliminating additional paperwork and saving everyone time and effort. It also provides veterinarians with all relevant information about the animal in question and its previous treatments, complaints and pre-existing conditions. Veterinarians and owners can review various treatment options and make an informed decision for the next course of action. These advantages helped Trupanion establish a strong competitive moat.

Trupanion translated its early lead and significant market opportunity into rapid revenue growth. By the end of the third quarter, Trupanion reached 1.1 million total registered pets, up 37% year over year. In the first nine months of 2021, the company grew revenue by 40% year over year, reaching $504.6 million. Trupanion has now grown its revenue by more than 20% for 56 consecutive quarters.

Long-term vision and effective execution for continued success

Trupanion holds a leading position in its industry, but it faces increasing competition. There are established competitors such as National Insurance and Allstate, emerging competitors such as Lemonade, and specialty insurers for small pets such as Healthy Paws.

Trupanion will need to continue to reinvent its business and execute a clearly defined long-term strategy to fend off the competition. Founder and CEO Rawlings outlined a five-year plan to reach $1.5 billion in annual revenue by 2025. To achieve this goal, Trupanion plans to expand partnerships, enter international markets, grow other types of pet insurance more suited to different segments. customers, and also introduce new product categories such as pet food and GPS devices for locating pets. The company recently partnered with the popular online pet food and service company Soft, allowing Chewy’s 20 million customers to purchase Trupanion’s insurance plans on Chewy’s website. Although the two companies did not disclose details of the partnership, it gives Trupanion access to a very large cohort of potential customers.

Investors should remember that Trupanion is not yet profitable as the company continues to invest in technology, sales and marketing to drive growth. For the first nine months of 2021, Trupanion spent 20.4% of its revenue on operating expenses, compared to 16.7% for the same period last year. As a result, the net loss margin worsened to around 6% from less than 1%, and the company burned through $6.2 million in cash, after posting $13.2 million in free cash flow. during the period of the previous year. Although its losses are quite small at the moment, investors should keep a close eye on Trupanion’s operating expenses and focus on profitability.

The current setback may be an opportunity

Similar to many high-flying growth stocks, shares of Trupanion have been battered as part of the market sell-off, down around 50% from their November 2021 highs. negotiate at an estimate of the sales price. around 5.6, still at the top of its previous trading range. However, Trupanion’s growth record, standing in the industry, and long track ahead of him probably justifies this bounty. Now may be the time for long-term investors to add this strong company to their portfolio.

Table of TRUP PS ratios

TRUP PS Ratio data by YCharts

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Kaustubh Deshmukh (KD) owns Chewy, Inc. and Lemonade, Inc. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Chewy, Inc., Lemonade, Inc. and Trupanion. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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Chipotle Earnings Snapshot: Rising Costs, Shortage of Employees Hamper Fourth Quarter Growth https://passpet.org/chipotle-earnings-snapshot-rising-costs-shortage-of-employees-hamper-fourth-quarter-growth/ Sat, 29 Jan 2022 12:41:00 +0000 https://passpet.org/chipotle-earnings-snapshot-rising-costs-shortage-of-employees-hamper-fourth-quarter-growth/ Chipotle Mexican Grill (NYSE: CMG) is expected to report its results for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2021 on February 8. Since the start of the pandemic, society has done an excellent job of adapting to changing consumer habits. As a result, its sales increased in 2020 despite Chipotle having to temporarily close its restaurants […]]]>

Chipotle Mexican Grill (NYSE: CMG) is expected to report its results for the fourth quarter of fiscal 2021 on February 8. Since the start of the pandemic, society has done an excellent job of adapting to changing consumer habits.

As a result, its sales increased in 2020 despite Chipotle having to temporarily close its restaurants for in-person dining. As economies reopen, the fast-food chain grapples with new challenges such as rising costs and a shortage of employees.

Image source: Getty Images.

Customers can’t get enough of Chipotle, but can it satisfy their appetite?

Fortunately, customer demand remains robust for Chipotle. In its most recent quarter, ended Sept. 30, comparable restaurant sales rose 15.1% from the same period a year earlier. Note that comparable restaurant sales represent revenue from locations open for at least 13 full calendar months. This measure aims to eliminate the impacts of restaurant openings and closings.

At the start of the pandemic, Chipotle moved quickly to provide a solid range of options for customers newly unable to dine at its restaurants. People could still take advantage of Chipotle by ordering through its website and picking it up in person or having it delivered. The management has also partnered with third-party services such as DoorDash and Uber, create another channel where customers could enjoy Chipotle’s menu items.

Even as economies reopen and people can dine at its premises, digital sales remain robust for Chipotle. In its most recent quarter, digital sales grew 8.6% and accounted for 42.8% of overall sales. Interestingly, more than half of all digital sales were orders placed online to be picked up in person. This is the most profitable type of transaction for Chipotle. Online orders free up staff to prepare food instead of taking a customer order and processing payment.

Reducing pressure on staff and increasing productivity per employee becomes especially vital now that the economy is facing vast labor shortages. Occupational health risks are exponentially higher than before the pandemic, while employee salaries are gradually increasing. Not surprisingly, fewer people are willing to accept these jobs. In the company’s third quarter earnings press release, management said it was confident in overcoming these near-term challenges to maintain momentum through the fourth quarter: “For the fourth quarter, so While uncertainty remains on multiple fronts, including the potential impact of COVID-19 as well as inflation and staffing pressures, we are encouraged by our strong underlying business momentum, and if this trend continues , we expect our comparable restaurant sales to be in the low to mid-double digit range.”

Yet growth could have been better without the shortages. Not only is Chipotle working diligently to adequately staff existing locations, but it also has ambitions to add new restaurants at a rate of 200 per year. It will be interesting to hear management discuss the impact on new store growth rate of labor shortages.

What this could mean for Chipotle investors

Wall Street analysts expect Chipotle to post revenue of $1.96 billion and earnings per share of $5.29. If it meets these projections, there would be increases of 22% and 52%, respectively, compared to the same period the previous year.

Chipotle’s stock is down nearly 20% since the start of 2022, possibly due to material and labor shortages. The company has already implemented wage increases and menu price increases. If management reports that labor shortages persist despite these increases, further increases may be needed to attract enough staff. Either that or the company must scale back its near-term new store growth ambitions.

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Parkev Tatevosian owns Chipotle Mexican Grill and Uber Technologies. The Motley Fool owns and recommends Chipotle Mexican Grill and DoorDash, Inc. The Motley Fool recommends Uber Technologies. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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